Halifax+Pride
Mending fences at Pride

Mending fences at Pride

In the midst of conversations around the world, and in the face of community criticism, Halifax Pride is changing. But will this shift be enough to heal the wounds of years past? And what else should Halifax Pride be addressing?
Kehisha Wilmot wishes Pride were more intersectional.

Pride Guide 2017

It's here, it's queer.
  At 30 years old, and with the fight for “GL rights” past the point where same-sex marriage is old news, can Halifax Pride be relevant to the struggles of the LGBTTIQQ2SAA+ generation? In this year’s Pride Guide, we look for answers.

Believe in Magic

This year’s parade grand marshals want to celebrate and showcase marginalized voices.
"Our goal is to give marginalized communities the space and time to create their own representation," says Emma Paulson, who along with Kate Macdonald makes up The Magic Project. The two photographers and activists were chosen by Halifax Pride as this year's parade grand marshals.

Addressing social issues through comedy

Internet star Dylan Marron and Dramatic Changes’ improv group challenge the idea that social justice and entertainment are mutually exclusive.
Evening Speaker Series: Dylan Marron Tuesday, July 25, 7pm Maritime Museum of the Atlantic 1675 Lower Water Street free

We’ve got spirit, yes we do; we’ve got spirit, up to two!

Halifax Pride takes on the complex Two-Spirit identity.
Queer Perspectives: Redefining Two-Spirit Identity Thursday, July 27, 12-1pm Halifax City Hall 1841 Argyle Street Free

Kamal Al-Solaylee is erasing borders

The author and journalist is using his own life to break down stereotypes about being gay and Muslim.

Evening Speaker Series: Kamal Al-Solaylee Wednesday, July 26, 7pm Maritime Museum of the Atlantic 1675 Lower Water Street

Happy ours: A history of local gay bars

A walk back in time, down the rainbow-brick road.
Halifax is a city with a vibrant history, and that extends into its queer culture. Since the first gay bar opened in 1971, Halifax’s queer community has found a home in nightlife.

Pride Guide

These are the gays of our lives. Click here for all of our Halifax Pride stories and event coverage.

Before the parade

Halifax's first generation of queer elders forged a rainbow path that LGBTQIA and Two-Spirited activists continue to march down today.
It was spring of 1972 when Anne Fulton stumbled upon a poster that read It’s Time for Gay Liberation.

Magic Monster

The queer and contemporary Canadian sensation Closet Monster offers up a surreal coming-out tale.
"What I wanted to do was make a film that reflected the modern Newfoundland," says the writer-director Stephen Dunn, whose festival darling debut feature Closet Monster opens this week.

Samson Learn is travelling down the Trans*Canada highway

Filmmaker’s documentary chronicles the lives of transgender Canadians across the country.
Samson Learn is calling from the road, somewhere between Montreal and Ottawa.

Mount Saint Vincent University's pulpy look at the past

The university's collection of lesbian pulp fiction (one of the largest in North America) turns 20.
Two women lock eyes across a crowded room.

Tel Aviv tourism concerns are misplaced, says Atlantic Jewish Council board member

Rainbow Action Project submits petition looking to ban Israeli tourism promotion at Halifax Pride.
The promotion of Tel Aviv tourism at Halifax Pride continues to raise debate, but a member of the Atlantic Jewish Council says the Queer Arabs of Halifax and other concerned groups are misinformed about his organization’s presence at Pride.

Atlantic Canadian magazine focuses on queer content

Outport, a St. John’s based mag, expanded its coverage this year.
The Outport Magazine has got LGBTQIA Atlantic Canadians covered.

Asexual and aromantic folks claim their place at Pride

Exploring the “A” in LGBTQIA.
On the first day of Halifax Pride week, Ky Greyson arrives at a coffee shop sporting a huge smile, freshly dyed cotton candy hair with matching pink eyebrows, and black leggings that read “unavailable.” He’s bursting with enthusiasm when he asks me what gender pronouns I prefer.

Rad Pride brings the politics to pride week

The alternative queer festival is back with some must-see events.
We love pride week so much it brings little rainbow hearts to our eyes.

Halifax Pride and the responsibility of equality

This year’s annual LGBTQIA celebration takes place amidst a crisis for Pride.

 Halifax’s Pride festival is finally here, but not everyone is celebrating. The 11-day long festival kicks off today, arriving in the wake of the Pulse nightclub shooting last month that left 49 people murdered in Orlando, Florida, and a surge in protests across the United States and Canada against the use of police violence.

Let's learn non-binary drag with Rhett Slutler

The gender-fucking performer looks beyond the rigid rules of maleness and femaleness.
Rhett Slutler spent the first year of drag learning the rules: Don’t show your tape.

Paint the town Rad

The rebels of Rad Pride are bringing Pride Week back to its activist roots.
Pride began as a protest. Demands for political change brought together LGBTQIA activists who took to the streets of New York City 46 years ago.

I’s the bi

It’s not a phase. Bisexuality is real, it’s important and it has a place at Pride.
Mike Morse feels bisexuality gets a bad rap."People think that we can't make up our minds, that we're really greedy," Morse says. During last year's Pride week, Morse and their partner Alix Todd noticed there weren't any events geared towards people who identify as bisexual.

Take me to church

Keeping the faith at some of Halifax’s most inclusive religious spaces.
Religion has typically been at the root of many homophobic arguments, but for many religious leaders in Halifax, those attitudes are out of date.  St. John's United Church has been one of the leaders in paving the way for LGBTQIA-friendly religious spaces in the city.

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In Print This Week

Vol 25, No 26
November 23, 2017

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