Pin It
Favourite

The Long March Home 

by Zoë S. Roy (Inanna)

longmarch-rev.jpg
Roy begins her tale just before the birth of its protagonist, Yezi, during the Cultural Revolution in Mao’s China. From the opening page Roy establishes the omnipresent fear of tyranny, which permeates life’s every decision, be it minor (what to wear) or major (whether to keep a child, and what to name it). Step wrong and be judged harshly. Even children shout each other down in educational exercises. Yezi finds a child’s pleasures, like raising silkworms with a friend, even as her mother is imprisoned and her father works in a forced-labour camp. Roy contextualizes and links the characters’ limited perspective to the broader world, especially America, through family histories and politics. She does so without over-explaining, and subtly shows Yezi’s eventual shock and adjustment to Western culture. At times the story drifts, coming across as a series of anecdotes. But ultimately Roy connects an uncertain beginning to a satisfying end.
Pin It
Favourite

Latest in Literary

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Chris Benjamin

Survey Asks

Canada will co-host the World Cup in eight years. What does this mean for Halifax?

  • Nothing

View Results

Art Attack

More »

In Print This Week

Vol 26, No 3
June 14, 2018

Cover Gallery »


Real Time Web Analytics

© 2018 Coast Publishing Ltd.