HaligonianBatman 
Member since Apr 25, 2017


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Re: “Clinic’s move to Bayers Lake is poor planning, a waste of public funds

CityMouse1 I did read your comment. I don't understand the distinction you are current trying to make. Perhaps I've misunderstood you in general, but you do appear to be advocating decentralization and sprawl, so mainly I'm responding to that.

5 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by HaligonianBatman on 04/26/2017 at 12:50 PM

Re: “Clinic’s move to Bayers Lake is poor planning, a waste of public funds

CITY MOUSE1, I think you may have misunderstood my point. I did not say we need more parking downtown, I would agree that we have plenty for the existing usage. My point was that if Halifax doesn't currently have the economic capacity to develop new parks then the vacuum effect of further decentralization, and continual infrastructural expenditure to support it, will make such programs less feasible, not more.

You demonstrate the kind of uninformed suburbanism that plagues our city and province. People who do not understand that you can't just have everything you want in one place, and move any functional necessity or minor inconvenience out to some far flung ghetto.

Your last sentence seems somewhat abbreviated... Not sure what you meant by it. You definitely did suggest we could "put paradise back on those parking lots" in your original comment. The funny thing about that is that in order to do this, you would support the development of the paradisal forests that surround Halifax, paving them over with... parking lots. That's what further sprawl and development in Bayers Lake actually does.

By the way, we actually have quite a bit of paradise on the peninsula already... "City of trees" and all that.

3 likes, 6 dislikes
Posted by HaligonianBatman on 04/26/2017 at 11:54 AM

Re: “Clinic’s move to Bayers Lake is poor planning, a waste of public funds

CITY MOUSE1 (I'm not sure your name fits you btw), no actually, I'm not. I get the reference, and don't mind the song. However, I'm choosing to bring a serious response to a weak joke in a discussion that is sadly lacking in informed opinions.

Halifax is not a dense city.

Halifax isn't even a congested city (compare it to any other major city centre in Canada).

Halifax (and the broader province by extension) is not a prosperous economy, largely because it has to shell out ridiculous amounts of money to bring services to the geographically largest municipality in the country.

Halifax could be a prosperous economy, but only if it's walkable, and accessible, and makes good use of the space we already have (LOTS of vacancy downtown). To your point ADELE MACDONALD, maybe having to drive into the city for - shocker - certain expensive services that can't be provided in every one horse town, is part of the inherent real-world cost of choosing to live in unsustainable, sprawling suburban communities and beyond. And what are they saving? An extra 30-40 minutes? If they're driving in, they probably did it in a car, but many people living (sustainably, or, without the financial means) in Halifax won't have that option. Are they going to be expected to wait around for more bus routes (and stops, and constant municipal investment) to be installed?

Halifax is the only significant economic centre in Nova Scotia, but it will not thrive under the burden of continued sprawl. Nova Scotia will not thrive with no economic centres. Nobody gains income by saving a couple bucks on a drive into the city, and as it happens, everyone pays the price in the end.

8 likes, 7 dislikes
Posted by HaligonianBatman on 04/25/2017 at 8:00 PM

Re: “Clinic’s move to Bayers Lake is poor planning, a waste of public funds

CITY MOUSE1 (I'm not sure your name fits you btw), no actually, I'm not. I get the reference, and don't mind the song. However, I'm choosing to bring a serious response to a weak joke in a discussion that is sadly lacking in informed opinions.

Halifax is not a dense city.

Halifax isn't even a congested city (compare it to any other major city centre in Canada).

Halifax (and the broader province by extension) is not a prosperous economy, largely because it has to shell out ridiculous amounts of money to bring services to the geographically largest municipality in the country.

Halifax could be a prosperous economy, but only if it's walkable, and accessible, and makes good use of the space we already have (LOTS of vacancy downtown). To your point ADELE MACDONALD, maybe having to drive into the city for - shocker - certain expensive services that can't be provided in every one horse town, is part of the inherent real-world cost of choosing to live in unsustainable, sprawling suburban communities and beyond. And what are they saving? An extra 30-40 minutes round trip? If they're driving in, they probably did it in a car, but many people living (sustainably, or, without the financial means) in Halifax won't have that option. Are they going to be expected to wait around for more bus routes (and stops, and constant municipal investment) to be installed?

Halifax is the only significant economic centre in Nova Scotia, but it will not thrive under the burden of continued sprawl. Nova Scotia will not thrive with no economic centres. Nobody gains income by saving a couple bucks on a drive into the city, and as it happens, everyone pays the price in the end.

10 likes, 9 dislikes
Posted by HaligonianBatman on 04/25/2017 at 7:35 PM

Re: “Clinic’s move to Bayers Lake is poor planning, a waste of public funds

"Keeping the traffic off of the peninsula" will not allow us to "put paradise back on those urban lots". Regardless of the mild irritation that any level of traffic causes, Halifax actually suffers less than just about any Canadian civic centre from core congestion. Have you not noticed that you can still drive around and park downtown? Guess why... It's because Halifax is already essentially a low traffic, low density suburb. Less traffic on our streets (what little actually comes from people from the countryside visiting clinics) will not constitute a substantive change to the traffic conditions of the core, and you can bet it won't decrease the need for (or at least use of) urban land for parking purposes.

We need MORE centralization NOT LESS, and appropriate infrastructural investment to support it. That investment includes both a carefully considered approach for how to handle the (still very real) need for private vehiclular access, as well as making sure we integrate beautiful green spaces as we continue to develop and evolve the urban fabric. It's dangerous to act like the only thing in the way of the urban "paradise" you seek is parking lots, partly because it's simply not true and partly because that doesn't have to be the only solution. If you act like it is, you're pitting two things against eachother that don't need to be so categorically in opposition, and conflicts like that often lead to collateral damage.

17 likes, 8 dislikes
Posted by HaligonianBatman on 04/25/2017 at 12:03 PM

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