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Blue is the Warmest Colour 

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Sort of a French Brown Bunny, director Abdellatif Kechiche tests the audience’s love of banality with the lesbian love story Blue is the Warmest Colour. Teenage Adele (Adele Exarchopoulos) is a high schooler with a hot boyfriend she doesn’t like to have sex with, and she figures out why when she crosses paths with art student Emma (Lea Seydoux), whose hair is dyed a shock of blue (Kechiche has symbolism issues). Their courtship and relationship are intimately, exquisitely wrought, but it takes an awful long time to get there—it’s the rare film that can justify a three-hour running time, and this is not one—and Kechiche could’ve shaved some of the many scenes of Adele eating (she’s hungry, get it) and loafing around. The leads rightfully shared a special acting prize at Cannes—Exarchopoulos has a restless, electric energy tempered by Seydoux’s easygoing confidence. Together, they’re great, but the movie keeps forgetting.

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