anhaga 
Member since Mar 13, 2009


Stats

Friends

  • No friends yet.
Become My Friend Find friends »

Recent Comments

Re: “Concert loan scandal report out tomorrow

Gee, even a pipsqueak place like this can achieve greatness when it comes to being hoodwinked by unscrupulous types.

Posted by anhaga on 06/07/2011 at 7:11 AM

Re: “Convention central

"Convention Central" comments are interesting. If Bryan Burns can think af a catchy phrase to replace "Save the View" I wish he would. I'm sure everyone concerned about the view from Citadel Hill is aware that saving that view also saves the view in all other directions. Including, we hope, preserving some sunshine along Argyle Street.
Halifax, much to the chagrin of developers and political types who remain in denial, will never be New York or London or Vancouver. The peninsula is too small. Paris and Manhattan are livable and wonderful because there are long, wide streets with open ends. Here we are too small. the streets are too narrow, putting up a high rise inevitably closes things in and contributes to the claustrophobia alluded to by "thisislondon." A similar thing will occur in Dartmouth with the erection of Fares's development - the view will be blocked and small downtown Dartmouth will overshadowed in many ways.
Yes, let's have new housing, let's have spiffy offices to attract and keep businesses, but never at the expense of the history. You would never know in historic Florence that there is a modern Florence somewhere - but that certainly does not detract from the appeal of the ancient city! Also I applaud those who call for more transparency in the developments that seek input from governments, whether it is outright subsidy or simply requests for variances to regulations (like intruding into viewplanes).

Posted by anhaga on 04/09/2010 at 11:38 AM

Re: “Letters to the Editor

"Convention Central" comments are interesting. If Bryan Burns can think af a catchy phrase to replace "Save the View" I wish he would. I'm sure everyone concerned about the view from Citadel Hill is aware that saving that view also saves the view in all other directions. Including, we hope, preserving some sunshine along Argyle Street.
Halifax, much to the chagrin of developers and political types who remain in denial will never be New York or London or Vancouver. The peninsula is too small. Paris and Manhattan are livable and wonderful because there are long, wide streets with open ends. Here we are too small. the streets are too narrow, putting up a high rise inevitably closes things in and contributes to the claustrophobia alluded to by "thisislondon." A similar thing will occur in Dartmouth with the erection of Fares's development - the view will be blocked and small downtown Dartmouth will overshadowed in many ways.
Yes, let's have new housing, let's have spiffy offices to attract and keep businesses, but never at the expense of the history. You would never know in historic Florence that there is a modern Florence somewhere - but that certainly does not detract from the appeal of the ancient city! Also I applaud those who call for more transparency in the developments that seek input from governments, whether it is outright subsidy or simply requests for variances to regulations (like intruding into viewplanes).

Posted by anhaga on 04/09/2010 at 11:34 AM

Re: “Wasting away

Time for the big players to start to change their culture - obviously household composting can only do just so much.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by anhaga on 03/12/2010 at 4:45 PM

Re: “Welcome to the New Dartmouth

Well, what took you so long to notice what is going on over here?

I live near both of the two new highrise developments in Dartmouth - the Fares development, Kings Wharf, on the waterfront, and the newly proposed development within the area of Greenvale, Starr and Shubenacadie Canal. There is a question that is nagging me, beyond the usual concerns about the inappropriate heights of these buildings. (I don't think anyone denies that some sort of development is required, the problem is with the scale.) That niggling question is: why are the developers targeting the empty nesters, young and old, and the wealthy retired? They are busy touting ther "vision" but I see only an effort by them to make as much money as possible, as quickly as possible, and the historic community of Dartmouth be damned.

I would have thought that a mix of housing, including detached, semidetached and row housing for families would be ideal for downtown Dartmouth. For some time now families have been migrating to the suburbs, creating their own pressures on the municipality for infrastructure: water, sewer, transit, schools and so forth. Retail has contributed to this with the big boxes on the outskirts and closing of downtown stores in both Halifax and Dartmouth. But in the new world of today, such families would like to live closer to downtown where many of them work, if only they could afford it!

Another possibility to include in the mix would be a different kind of retirement community, one which caters to the tastes and high levels of education many baby boomers have, so that they can continue to enjoy their lives without feeling the need to migrate to places like Victoria or Florida. Wouldn't it be fabulous if funding could be found for Dalhousie or St Mary's to partner with a developer, and possibly other public and private institutions, to create such a community on the vacant land next to Greenvale and Starr? A partnership with the Waterfront Campus of the Community College could result in the construction of "green" and carbon-neutral buildings. Now that would be an address worth having!

So my ideal "New Dartmouth" would include the proposed developments, although scaled back to a more appropriate size. Kings Wharf would include a large component accommodating middle income families - there are already schools, a library and public transit in the neighbourhood, we just need a grocery store and a hardware store. There is space for that where the harbourfront Market now is: long ago a Dominion store! And the development on the shores of the Shubenacadie Canal, where the inclined plane may be daylighted, would be ideal as a mix of family and retired people, with a partnership with educational institutions to enhance the quality of life of the entire downtown. I believe that bringing in this type of mixture of people would be healthy and contribute to the lasting revitalization of Dartmouth.

So there could be an amazing vision for downtown Dartmouth. Is there any chance that our politicians, the ones with the power to make the decisions that will change this city forever, is there any chance that they will see beyond the developers' rose-tinted glasses to the true city that is possible, and really does lie within our reach? Let it be so.

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by anhaga on 02/21/2010 at 9:56 AM

Re: “NDP's VLT flip-flop

The NDP got elected because Dexter was able to show the electorate that it is not a scary party - in fact it is very like the Liberals and the Consevatives - all well-intetioned human beings. Now that the NDP is in office, and with a majority, it should be principled enough to stand for the philosophy that people bought into - the NDP supports regular people and ordinary families. Get rid of the VLTs. If there is a monetary shortfall, raise taxes. If the money so raised is spent wisely, to support the ordinary citizen and not (as the old line parties do) to prop up businesses and corporations and reward friends of the politicians, then the electorate will be plesed that their money is being well spent. Dexter needs to behave as though he has a majority. He CAN effect change, and has lots of time to do it. No better time to start, than right now!

Posted by anhaga on 08/08/2009 at 10:04 AM

Re: “Crossing the law

One annoying section of street, Alderney Drive near the library, has become increasingly dangerous, probably as a result of tweaking the light cycle to make it easier for cars to speed through the three consecutive intersections with traffic lights. Not only do pedestrians now have to press a signal button, every one of the signals seems to operate differently. One has a count down and also gives a long time to cross in one of the directions, adequate in the other; the middle one has a yellow button that I suspect is purely decorative, and you have to wait through two cycles of the other lights before this one changes; the third one, at the foot of Portland Street, is the most problematic. Since the changes to the middle light described above, I constatly see cars failing to slow down when the light changes, speeding through red lights. If I see this happening so frequently during my very short time in the neighbourhood each day, how often is it really occurring? That light is one of those where if you miss the change, you have to wait through a second cycle. As this is the corner many ferry and bus passengers cross at you would have thought more effort would be made to make it a pedestrian-friendly intersection. Those of us who cross there regularly generally have given up obeying the law. We would waste far too much of our time. Press the button, yes, but cross whenever it is safe. By the way, I suppose it is easier to sic the police on the jaywalkers, not the drivers who run the red light, so I'm not expecting good changes here.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by anhaga on 03/13/2009 at 9:49 AM

Saved Events

  • Nada.
Find events »

Custom Lists

  • Zip.

Favorite Places

  • None.
Find places »

Saved Stories

  • Nope.
Find stories »

Real Time Web Analytics

© 2017 Coast Publishing Ltd.