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Tuesday, November 19, 2019

Ten questions with New Hermitage

The Halifax-born ambient, improvised noise maker talks splurging on popcorn at the movies and why it'll always ride hard for NoFX.

Posted By on Tue, Nov 19, 2019 at 1:24 PM

Halifax-born band slash sound experiment New Hermitage is like a dreamy soundtrack to your fave sci-fi novel. - SUBMITTED PHOTO
  • Halifax-born band slash sound experiment New Hermitage is like a dreamy soundtrack to your fave sci-fi novel.
  • Submitted photo
The four-piece ambient, improvised music group New Hermitage has been melting brains and building mazes of sound since 2017.  The basis of what unfolds before your ears and eyes onstage is a Ray Bradbury-sounding experiment, described in the band's press release as follows:

"New Hermitage imagines a future in which pollution has decimated the population of the Earth and dangerously high levels of toxicity have rendered the cities of the world uninhabitable. The surviving humans are forced to live in nomadic clans that wander the sparse wilderness, struggling to claim what little natural resources remain. However, a few solitary people have returned to the cities. With patience and tenderness, these new hermits balance technology with ancient wisdom to work with nature and restore the planet. The music of New Hermitage imagines the soundtrack to their survival, incorporating what these lone individuals might hear among the crumbling cities they call home."

It is, in short, music that's mind-altering, time-travelling and a hell of a trip.

As the band prepares to take your ears into the future on Friday, Nov 22 at an $15/PWYC, 8pm Radstorm show, we got the gang to fill out our questionnaire—which they say was completed in the tour van at some point between Chicoutimi, QC, and Ottawa, ON.

1. What was the first album you ever bought with your own money?

Ross Burns, guitar: NoFX's White Trash, Two Heebs and a Bean
Ellen Gibling, harp: Hanson's MMmbop? Is that what the album is called?
India Gailey, cello: I have trouble remembering. It might be American Idiot by Green Day. Maybe Goodstuff by the B52’s?
Andrew MacKelvie, woodwinds: Running with Scissors by Weird Al.

2. If you were to name your influences, which name on the list would be most surprising?


R: NoFX - White Trash, Two Heebs and a Bean. It’s a bit weird to answer that question.

I: How are you supposed to know the answer to the question? How do you know what influences you?

E: What did Ross write? That works for me.
A: The Great Muppet Caper sound track? Specifically “It’s a movie.” 



ALL: Stevie Wonder - Overjoyed

3. What’s the best concert or live performance you’ve ever gone to?

E: Id M Theft Able at Thunder and Lightening [in Sackville, NB]as part of an OBEY Satellite show we played together.
R: I did go to a NoFX concert when I was 13, but you don’t need to say that.
I: The one that sticks out is the Grizzly Bear concert I saw in Montreal a few years ago. Id M Theft Able is up there too.
A: I saw David Mott (a baritone saxophonist) play at 1313 Hollis in 2008 and in the middle of his solo he walked out onto the street and kept playing.

4. What one thing/person outside of music has shaped the way you make music?

A: Growing up in the country and listening to the sounds of the world around me. House hold appliances.
I: Buddhism. Visual Art. (A: like paintings of bowls of fruit?)
R: Sport

5. Share the last gif you used below:


[No one in the New Hermitage van knew how to attach a gif.]

6. Share the last shot on your camera roll below:
A sweet stage setup from New Hermitage's current tour.
  • A sweet stage setup from New Hermitage's current tour.
7. When you’re not making music, what are you most likely to be found doing?

I: Like, eating, sleeping, that kind of thing?

R: Cartwheels and handstands, actually.
E: Eating cheese based nourishment.
A: Going to school. I am also a full time student these days.

8. What’s your perfect cure for a bad day?


R: Swimming

I: A perfect avocado. Some ginseng tea.
E: Ricochet Robots or playing chess.com.
A: Letting it ride out. There is no cure.

9. What’s the best part about being in a band?

R: The jokes, the snacks, the togetherness.

E: Street Cred. 

I: The fame and fortune. Don’t write that. I second the jokes.
A: It (music) gets better with time. Seeing the country and meeting new people.

10. What do you do when you wanna treat yourself?

I: Take a bath, I guess. Read the New Yorker! Actually, no, that’s not true. I go to the woods to treat myself.
R: Playing the tambourine and watching blue planet in the daytime.
E: Reading in a sweet hammock. 

A: I go to the movies, and I spend the $30 for a popcorn and a drink. Also, in the daytime. Also, I am high.
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Thursday, November 7, 2019

Celebrate a winning weekend with these Sure Things

Posted By on Thu, Nov 7, 2019 at 4:42 PM

Have simply the best weekend with Sure Things like the Best of Halifax Ball, Rebecca Thomas's symphony debut, a tribute to icon Portia White and more.

2019 Fringe Fest favourite Kick At The Dark Theatre Co-op returns with a play that's equal parts stand-up comedy and storytelling. - STOO METZ PHOTO
  • 2019 Fringe Fest favourite Kick At The Dark Theatre Co-op returns with a play that's equal parts stand-up comedy and storytelling.
  • Stoo Metz photo
Romeo & Juliet: a drink-along
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday

A quartet of performers work through the ultimate boy-meets-girl play, all while imbibing. "Will they drink themselves into an oblivion before the fated lovers‘ tragic end? You’ll have to buy a ticket to find out!" event organizers add. Featuring sweet dance moves, hand-stitched ruffled collars, many a beer and equal parts kissing and fighting scenes, it ain't the bard's ballad—except that it sort of is. It all goes down at Good Robot Brewing. more deets

Every Brilliant Thing
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday

Ice cream, the colour yellow, people falling over: These are the sorts of little things a child begins listing for his mother as her battle with depression continues. As time passes, the list grows—and becomes a record of life’s small joys. Billed as part stand-up and part story telling, this play by Kick At The Dark Theatre Co-op shows at The Bus Stop Theatre. more deets

The Best of Halifax Ball
Friday

The best of the best, as voted by you in our annual readers' choice survey, celebrate their excellence at this swank party at the Delta Halifax Hotel. Come bask in the awesomeness. more deets

Decidedly Jazz Danceworks
Saturday

Need more Will in your world? Live Art Dance brings the Calgary movement troupe to town to showcase Juliet and Romeo, a decidedly jazz take on Shakespeare created by Kimberley Cooper and Cory Bowles. more deets

Jenny Yujia Shi's latest show—her biggest to date—sees the Halifax-based artist mark the end of an era in her work. - JENNY YUJIA SHI ARTWORK
  • Jenny Yujia Shi's latest show—her biggest to date—sees the Halifax-based artist mark the end of an era in her work.
  • Jenny Yujia Shi artwork

Suddenly It Is As Though Nothing Had Happened

Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday

Studio 21 itself sums up its latest showcase, saying: "Figurative painter Brian Burke was one of the most extraordinary artists to have come out of PEI. He was a genius at capturing psychological states of being through minimal means. Studio 21 director Deborah Carver recently visited Burke’s home in Murray Harbour, PEI, to select works for this exhibition." more deets

This Does Not Authorize Re-Entry
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday

The latest showcase by Jenny Yujia Shi coincides with the approval of her permanent resident status—a process that’s shaped her life and work for a decade as she’s chronicled the newcomer experience through her art. “I take this opportunity to explore and reflect upon the process of navigating through the Canadian immigration system—a self-hood pieced together with numbers, abbreviated codes and a passport,” her artist’s statement adds. Celebrate the closing of a chapter with the artist at The Craig Gallery. more deets

Althea Thauberger: The State of the Situation
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday

Althea Thauberger has garnered international attention since the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia first showed her work in 2004, and now, in The State of the Situation, the gallery is pleased to present the first overview of her practice and collaborative art-making process. more deets

screen_shot_2019-11-07_at_4.31.01_pm.png
Without Rules
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday

Impressionistic realist oil painter Henry Tian and fibre artist Jessica Steponaitis celebrate new works with a shared showcase that flaunts their self-taught skills at Art 1274 Hollis. more deets







Soprano Harolyn Blackwell pays tribute to Portia White with a note-for-note redux of White's famed Town Hall concert. - CECILACONCERTS.CA SCREENSHOT
  • Soprano Harolyn Blackwell pays tribute to Portia White with a note-for-note redux of White's famed Town Hall concert.
  • cecilaconcerts.ca screenshot
Rebecca Thomas w/Symphony Nova Scotia
Thursday

Former poet laureate and recently published author Rebecca Thomas—whose verse we once described “as melodic and witty as it is damning”—proves there’s nothing she can’t do as she teams up with Symphony Nova Scotia to deliver a challenging, captivating new work. more deets

Bryan McPherson
Friday

The sonic son of Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen, raised in the rough-and-tumble of Dorchester, Boston, Bryan McPherson is what happens when an Americana-tinged sound gets sieved through a punk attitude: Working-class songs that make your head nod, feet tap and middle fingers fly up. Catch it at Gus' Pub. more deets

Genius Child: Portia White at Town Hall feat. Harolyn Blackwell
Saturday

It's been 75 years since Truro-born soprano Portia White made her New York City debut with a legendary Town Hall show (that also featured history-making poet and Black activist Langston Hughes dropping verses, in the same venue where Billie Holiday made her name). Here, Cecilia Concerts pays tribute to the iconic performance, with lyric coloratura soprano and Broadway star Harolyn Blackwell delivering a note-for-note tribute, complete with live piano backing at Saint George's Round Church. more deets

screen_shot_2019-11-07_at_4.40.13_pm.png
Paper Beat Scissors
Thursday

If you’re not familiar with Tim Crabtree’s project Paper Beat Scissors, get with it—because all your favourite artists are: Crabtree has worked with the likes of Arcade Fire's Jeremy Gara and sad-rock sultan Michael Feuerstack. Now, the honest songs and haunting vocals of PBS return to Crabtree’s old Halifax stomping grounds (the band sprouted here before setting up in Montreal). more deets
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Friday, November 1, 2019

Ten questions with Alestorm

The Scottish kings of pirate metal on the addictive rush of Magic the Gathering and Mountain Dew.

Posted By on Fri, Nov 1, 2019 at 3:18 PM

If Will Turner from Pirates of the Caribbean was transplanted to the 21st century and took up music, he'd probably join Alestorm. - ROBERT ZEMBRZYCKI PHOTO
  • If Will Turner from Pirates of the Caribbean was transplanted to the 21st century and took up music, he'd probably join Alestorm.
  • Robert Zembrzycki photo
Sailing the high seas of heavy metal since the mid-2000s, the members of Scottish band Alestorm wanna melt your face with Metallica-inspired guitars while having their tongues firmly planted in their cheeks. Probably the biggest pirate metal band out there—something the five-piece leans into with album titles like Captain Morgan's Revenge and song titles like "Fucked With An Anchor"—theirs is a perfect blend of kooky fun and serious song craft.

Here, in advance of a Saturday, Nov 2 show at The Marquee, the band's vocalist Christopher Bowes helps the dudes keep up their wild 'n' weird image while he answers our questionnaire:

1. What was the first album you bought with your own money?

"Oh god, it was pretty awful. I went to a record store and had no idea what I was doing, I think I got Slipknot’s first album, Vulgar Display of Power by Pantera, and Issues by Korn. Doesn’t get more entry-level spooky goth than that! My tastes rapidly evolved, thankfully."


2. If you were to name your influences, which name on the list would be most surprising?

"I’m sure people expect all the usual folky shite like Turisas and Korpiklaani and Finntroll, but these days I get more ideas from hot country artists like Luke Bryan and Kenny Chesney! Those dudes (or at least, their writing team) can make some real catchy music."


3. What’s the best concert or live performance you’ve ever gone to?

"Recently it was seeing the Book of Mormon on Broadway, that was absolutely phenomenal! Haven’t laughed like that in years. On a more metal level, probably seeing Blind Guardian for the first time at Metalcamp festival in Slovenia, in 2007. I had a wee cry, it was so wonderful."


4. What one thing/person outside of music has shaped the way you make music?

"Having to pay bills! If you’re gonna do music full time, you don’t have any other time to get a regular job. But life isn’t free. So you gotta work out a way to make good music while somehow making it profitable. It’s the unfortunate reality of the music business, that every professional musician is compromised in some way by the reality of existence. Everyone is a sellout on some level."

5. Share the last GIF you used below:

screen_shot_2019-11-01_at_3.10.43_pm.png








"BUSINESS FISH IS LIFE."

6. Share the last shot on your camera roll below:

screen_shot_2019-11-01_at_3.13.08_pm.png












"You probably think I’m a maniac now, haha. I just enjoy the responsible ownership of firearms! Taking a friend to the gun range today, so I was showing him what we’re gonna shoot. Got an AK-47, two AR-15’s, a 20ga Pump Action shotgun, and a tiny wee blue Ruger 10/22."

7. When you’re not making music, what are you most likely to be found doing?

"It occupies a lot of my time, either being on tour, at home doing music business stuff, or writing songs. When I’m not doing that I like to play Magic the Gathering. Cardboard crack, man!"


8. What’s your perfect cure for a bad day?

"A giant cup of Mountain Dew and a barbecue sandwich."


9. What’s the best part about being a musician?

"I get to wake up really late. How good is sleeping in in the morning? Sometimes I wake up at a normal time and it terrifies me. What do people do at 9am? Why does it exist?"


10. What do you do when you wanna treat yourself?

"Meth, injected straight into the eyeballs."
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Thursday, October 31, 2019

Stop, pop and roll: Our favourite moments of Halifax Pop Explosion 2019

The mega music fest continues to surprise and inspire.

Posted By on Thu, Oct 31, 2019 at 5:50 PM

Rich Aucoin delivered a decidedly atypical hometown show this HPX. - SCOTT MUNN PHOTO
  • Rich Aucoin delivered a decidedly atypical hometown show this HPX.
  • Scott Munn photo
To call Halifax Pop Explosion a varied fest feels obvious: The venerable event has been celebrating the best of local, national and international acts for more than two decades. A peep at this year's schedule alone—which saw bluegrass-y concerts in churches slotted next to sweeping emo showcases on the city's biggest stages—belies both the breadth of experience and sound that awaits when you buy a wristband.

Festival headliner and Coast cover star Haviah Mighty might've had just as much fun at HPX 2019 as we did. - @HAVIAHMIGHTY SCREENSHOT
  • Festival headliner and Coast cover star Haviah Mighty might've had just as much fun at HPX 2019 as we did.
  • @haviahmighty screenshot
All of this is to say that you can expect two things at HPX: To see something great and to be surprised. As Coast contributors navigated the three-day schedule, here were the moments that ticked both boxes, standing out as highlights in a sea of stars:
"The best part of HPX is seeing something you’ve never seen in Halifax before," writes music journalist Jonathan Briggins. "A highlight this year was a Halifax artist who has played a million shows in his hometown, but rarely something like this: Arriving in an inflatable coffin, Rich Aucoin brought his album release to life at St. Matthew’s Church with a dozen talented musician pals. The party-pop star left the parachute and confetti cannon home and replaced it with a pipe organ and multiple saxophone solos. It was magnificent, ambitious and a reminder of how seriously Aucoin takes his craft."

PUP came to slay, rocking hard for a sold-out HPX crowd. - VANESSA HEINS PHOTO
  • PUP came to slay, rocking hard for a sold-out HPX crowd.
  • Vanessa Heins photo
To Coast writer Alec Martin, a good post-concert afterglow is what it's all about:      "As I followed the crowd out of the Marquee after PUP’s show on Friday, I heard plenty of people talking about their new bruises—but heard just as many people excited about how they found a new favourite band in one of the openers, Weakened Friends," Martin writes in an email.
"This embodies what I think is the most important part of any music festival: Going to see a band you love and  coming away with a new act to follow and support as they grow."

To concert reviewer Mary Collier, good ambiance is why live music can't be beat: "My favourite moment of HPX was seeing Spencer Krug and Charlotte Cornfield at the Saint Matthew’s United Church," she writes. "The combination of the grand piano, stained glass windows and the acoustics of the church was enchanting. It was one of those moments where I just felt so lucky to be there to soak in such a unique show."

As for me, I'm still reeling over the always-excellent live show Snotty Nose Rez Kids put together—it felt like the entire Seahorse Tavern was jumping in unison as MCs Young Trybez and Young D bounced razor-sharp lines off each other, pulling off a lyrical two-step matched only by giants of the genre like OutKast (feels like a hyperbole, but I promise it's not).

Here's to the songs still stuck in our heads and the fun that awaits next year.
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Sure Things, Halloweekend edition

The best costume parties and Jack-o-Lantern farewells await below.

Posted By on Thu, Oct 31, 2019 at 4:22 PM

So, you're a last-minute Halloween lover and you're trying to decide where to debut your costume. We've got your back with a roundup of the top parties in town, both tonight and over the weekend. Trick or treat on!
That '90s Night gets into the scary spirit with a Halloween-themed throwback party. - TIFFANY NAUGLER PHOTO
  • That '90s Night gets into the scary spirit with a Halloween-themed throwback party.
  • Tiffany Naugler photo
A night of comedy at the silent movies w/organist Shawn Whynot
Saturday
A screening of the silent comedy Safety Last is rounded out with a live soundtrack courtesy of organist Shawn Whynot at Bethany United Church. more deets

Harvest Hootenanny and Pumpkin Smash
Saturday

Head to Common Roots Urban Farm's new location—the BiHi park at the bottom of Bayers Road—for its annual celebration of the harvest season, complete with food, music, warm cider, garlic planting and pumpkin smashing. Bring your old Jack-o-Lanterns and come celebrate the season together. more deets

That '90s Night Halloween Party
Friday

Your favourite night of throwbacks gets in on scary season with a costumes-encouraged dance party at The Marquee. more deets

Little Coffee Shop of Horrors
Thursday

A night of fright awaits as spine-chilling stories by the likes of Edgar Allan Poe, Angela Carter and Roald Dahl are told by candlelight at Cafe Lara—before DJ Andru "The Conjurer" Branch closes things out with a wild dance party. more deets

A Villainous Hallowe'en Party
Thursday

The beloved indie theatre troupe Villain's Theatre gets into the spine-chilling spirit with a party at the Local Council of Women House that boasts a silent auction, costume contest, treats and tricks. more deets

Board Room Trivia: Horror Movies
Thursday

From classic black-and-whote horror movies to modern slasher flicks, this trivia sesh at The Board Room Game Cafe tests your knowledge of 'em all. more deets

RobieScope screens The Simpsons' "Treehouse of Horror"
Thursday

A free, outdoor screening at Good Robot of the classic Simpsons Halloween episodes to mark the scariest night of the year. more deets
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Monday, October 21, 2019

Review: Jeremy Dutcher and Symphony Nova Scotia float your soul in a sea of song

The Polaris-winning artist continues to change the cultural current, one live show at a time.

Posted By on Mon, Oct 21, 2019 at 5:38 PM

When Jeremy Dutcher won the Polaris Prize in 2018, he said: "Canada, you are in the midst of an Indigenous renaissance. Are you ready to hear the truth that needs to be told?" - MATT BARNES PHOTO
  • When Jeremy Dutcher won the Polaris Prize in 2018, he said: "Canada, you are in the midst of an Indigenous renaissance. Are you ready to hear the truth that needs to be told?"
  • Matt Barnes photo
A spotlight beams down over two women on stools, warm blue. With soft voices, they share a Mi’kmaq lesson: “This land is known as the land of deep water,” says Ursula Johnson to Angela Parsons. “Kinuk” is the opening act of Jeremy Dutcher’s co-performance with Symphony Nova Scotia. It’s a subtle sign the evening will be unusual compared to standard symphony fare.

Between the symphony and Dutcher, the music of several Indigenous musicians was played the evening of October 17. Instrumental songs rested on the rhythmic thumping of drums, like the determined ebb and flow of little waves on the beach. When Dutcher came on stage, the atmosphere quickened. The sold-out Rebecca Cohn was flooded with sound.

His voice is elemental.

Dutcher is a young person who has found what he is meant to do. His voice contains multitudes. In turns it is smooth, bold, warm, flexible, noble, sweet. It has a velvet vibrato. It swells to fill the auditorium and penetrates your body.

His rich, throaty resonance massages your brain. Another show-goer leaned over and whispered “this is soul-touching music.” Listeners are submerged.

And, reaching through it all, from a great distance, is a faint recording of another singer without a symphony: It is the scratchy wail of an ancestor, singing the same song 110 years ago. The voice of the past. Dutcher breathes new life into the song. He is the voice of the present. The symphony lifts the voices up like a rising tide. The music swells. Together, they launch these visceral, eternal songs into the future.
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Friday, October 18, 2019

Ten questions with Dave Sampson

The Cape Breton crooner celebrates a new, Nashville-recorded EP with a few Moscow mules and maybe even a new hat.

Posted By on Fri, Oct 18, 2019 at 5:43 PM

Hat game on fleek, Mr. Sampson. - SUBMITTED PHOTO
  • Hat game on fleek, Mr. Sampson.
  • Submitted photo
Folk music strained through an indie-pop sieve is the signature of Nova Scotia's own Dave Sampson, who arrives at The Marquee on Oct 19 to celebrate his new album, All Types of Ways, with a hometown(-ish) show.

Sampson was born in Cape Breton and spent time in Nashville as he cut All Types of Ways, meaning he's most at home in the sorts of spots where music is a strong thread in the cultural fabric. Having collaborated with the likes of Gordie Sampson and Donovan Woods, the balladeer is ready to win you over.

Here, he answers our questionnaire.

1. What was the first album you bought with your own money?

No joke, The first album I ever bought was Chumbawamba. I remember saving up my money and walking to the Sydney Shopping Mall (we called it the grub mall) and buying it at Sam the Record Man's.

2. If you were to name your influences, which name on the list would be most surprising?

Gordie Sampson
Kacey Musgraves
Tom Petty
Jason Isabell
Rita MacNeil ( Most surprising? She's a Cape Breton legend!)

3.What’s the best concert or live performance you’ve ever gone to?

I've seen a lot of concerts over the last few years but I saw John Prine at the Rebecca Cohn a few years ago and that was really special. I have been a fan of his music and writing since I was a kid. HIs voice isn't great these days, but the songs still hold the same amount of weight.

4. What one thing/person outside of music has shaped the way you make music?

I think growing up in Cape Breton shaped the way I make music and how I perform. It's such a musician community there and I realized quick that there are no free claps in Cape Breton—meaning if you wanted the respect and attention of the listeners you need to have you performance together.

5. Share the last GIF you used below:

unnamed.gif

6. Share the last shot on your camera roll below:
image002.png
[Editor's note: Sampson's set list makes good on our theory that building the perfect concert is, indeed an art.]

8. What’s your perfect cure for a bad day?

I think getting together with friends and shooting the shit, that usually will take my mind off anything thats bothering me.

9. What’s the best part about being a musician?

Being able to create my own schedule has been awesome, I always had a hard time working for other people so its nice to be in control now and decide if I want to do something or not.

10. What do you do when you wanna treat yourself?

DENIM.

HATS.

MOSCOW MULES.
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Thursday, October 10, 2019

Give thanks for the long weekend with these Sure Things

Posted By on Thu, Oct 10, 2019 at 5:41 PM

From Trixie Mattel's Halifax arrival to Carbon Arc's latest flick, here's the can't-miss turkey weekend fun to add to your calendar.
Trixie Mattel—a drag queen possibly even bigger than RuPaul—arrives in Halifax this weekend. - SUBMITTED PHOTO
  • Trixie Mattel—a drag queen possibly even bigger than RuPaul—arrives in Halifax this weekend.
  • Submitted photo

Nonna's very own: A comedy showcase with Marc-Anthony Sinagoga
Thursday

Up-and-coming comic Marc-Anthony Sinagoga makes you LOL hard enough to fuggetabout your worries at the Bus Stop Theatre. more deets

Trixie Mattel: Skinny Legend
Friday

The grand dame of drag—and winner of RuPaul's Drag Race All Stars' third season—arrives at the Spatz to take it from Thanksgiving to ThanksLIVING. In a year that included a documentary about the kween (spring’s Trixie Mattel: Moving Parts), it’s become clear this is one Barbie who cannot be stopped on her spike-heeled-climb to the top. As Mattel, who has two studio albums, a web series and a makeup line, told Fast Company in a May 4 article: “I just saw RuPual recently and he was like, ‘You’re doing things no one has ever done–not even me’.” more deets

Book launch: Crocuses Hatch from Snow
Thursday

In our 2019 Fall Arts Preview (Sep 19-25 issue), Coast writer/certified bookworm Jade Nauss summed up Jaime Burnet’s debut novel: “Burnet introduces readers to a cast of characters that rivals an Atom Egoyan film: There’s a body-piercer, a grieving widower, a young woman in love, a grandmother suffering from Alzheimer’s and a Mi’kmaw survivor of the residential school system. These characters’ lives intersect in a story about history, obsession, and gentrification set in the north end of Halifax. If that’s not enough of a reason to go grab this book as soon as it’s released, how about this: One of the characters has an affair with a ghost.” Meet the writer at this reading-and-signing sesh at the Halifax North Memorial Library. more deets

The Art of Self Defence screening
Friday

Carbon Arc’s latest flick sees Jesse Eisenberg take a star turn as a jiu jitsu practitioner exploring toxic masculinity. In an August review of the flick, The Coast described the film as “a deeply weird black comedy that doesn’t follow many traditional story lines—in addition to its vague era, there’s little reflection amongst the characters, there’s no fallout for committing violent crimes, and the resolution is far from feel-good"—but sometimes that's just what you need. more deets

Retro-futuristic fun arrives at the Saint Mary's University Art Gallery. - TOM HAMMICK ARTWORK
  • Retro-futuristic fun arrives at the Saint Mary's University Art Gallery.
  • Tom Hammick artwork

Age of Aquarius
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday

The Craft Nova Scotia Annual Member's Exhibition highlights works in a swath of mediums at the Mary E. Black Gallery. more deets

Tom Hammick: Lunar Voyage
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday

In a series of woodcut prints, Tom Hammick explores an “existential road journey taken through space,” while playfully examining the “outsiderness of being an artist” and a sort of nostalgia for the mid-20th century’s space speculations. See them at the Saint Mary's University Art Gallery. more deets

Dartmouth Visual Arts Semi-Annual Show & Sale
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday

The perennially popular showcase returns to the Craig Gallery. more deets

Bits
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday

Emily Ross' starburst paper art will be familiar to anyone who remembers the days of Big Pony (which Ross co-ran with Lindsay Stewart) and the prints she displayed there—but Lost & Found hosts Ross' first-ever exhibition. In Bits, Ross has cut colourful, patterned, metallic paper into triangular shapes that create dynamic fireworks across the shop's walls. more deets

Jessica Rhaye delivers a live rendition of her deep dives into Dylan's catalogue. - SUBMITTED PHOTO
  • Jessica Rhaye delivers a live rendition of her deep dives into Dylan's catalogue.
  • Submitted photo


Don Brownrigg w/Dance Movie
Saturday

Nominated for a whopping six Nova Scotia Music Awards, Brownrigg is bringing a bushel of earworms to The Seahorse for you to hear. more deets

Jessica Rhaye: Just Like A Woman, The Songs of Bob Dylan album release show
Saturday

In a Stan-worthy move only the biggest Dylan diehard could pull, New Brunswick folk queen Rhaye has spliced, examined and re-assembled ol’ Bob’s songbook. The result? A collection of covers that attempts to emulate the legend’s Basement Tapes-era energy while seeing some of the best songs about women ever written showcased through a woman’s gaze. It all goes down at The Carleton. more deets

Rudy Pacé w/Ryan Rideout, Rachel Raditz, Matt Steele
Thursday

With a new, nostalgic single about the small town he grew up in, Pacé brings a fresh, Americana vibe to The Carleton. more deets

Jom Comyn w/Nomadic Homes, Gianna Lauren
screen_shot_2019-10-10_at_5.38.34_pm.png
Thursday
Jom Comyn brings his self-described “baritone prairie swamp rock” to The Seahorse to celebrate a new album, with can’t miss opening sets by the indie-soul of Nomadic Homes and, from Gianna Lauren (pictured), atmospheric lullabies with a twist. Chill vibes await. more deets
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Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Behind the setlist with Adam Baldwin

Dartmouth's king of Americana says it's a matter of making sure your concert has a beginning, middle and end—and lots of three-chord bar rock.

Posted By on Wed, Oct 9, 2019 at 7:08 PM

Adam Baldwin's setlist for his Oct 5 Marquee show went heavy on offerings from his latest EP—and, as we see in guitarist Ryan Stanley's copy, didn't shy away from Stratocaster-soaked songs, either. - THE COAST PHOTO
  • Adam Baldwin's setlist for his Oct 5 Marquee show went heavy on offerings from his latest EP—and, as we see in guitarist Ryan Stanley's copy, didn't shy away from Stratocaster-soaked songs, either.
  • The Coast photo

Adam Baldwin was nervous about his headlining slot at The Marquee Ballroom on October 5: “I had been asking about ticket sales up to a couple days before,” he confesses, speaking by phone. “I made a decision to not look up at the crowd until I got right to the mic.”

He needn’t have worried—the 800-person venue was, if not at capacity, at least close. By the time he was two tracks deep, Baldwin sheepishly told the crowd “Well I really just gotta thank you all for being here, you have no idea what it means,”—clearly grasping for a word to convey the emotion in the room. He reached for the perfect adjective, but the crowd roared over him in applause.

He could’ve said almost anything and they’d have clapped their hands off.

What followed was a tight set that left room for all members of his band—including guest spots from Mo Kenney and Victoria Cameron—to shine. (Baldwin probably refuses to allow anyone to be relegated to the sidelines in equal parts because of his reverence for the E Street Band and having backed Matt Mays on guitar since day one.)

Here, Baldwin breaks down the winning setlist that steered them along: “There has to be a flow, like a movie: Act one, then act two to bring things down a bit and then act three, to bring as much excitement back into the crowd as possible. It’s the sort of thing I learned from burning CDs and playing with Matt [Mays].”

1. Intro song: “No Tellin’ When” from 2016’s No Tellin’ When
“Every show since we put that record out, we’ve started with that song. It opens the record and it always feels like the best way in. Ya know, old habits die hard.”

2. Songs four through seven: “Delirious,” “Half A Mind,” “No Rest for the Wicked” and “Dark Beside the Dawn” (which, according to the guitarist’s setlist, were all to be played on a Stratocaster)
“All those songs are from [the 2019 EP] No Rest For The Wicked. I just sort of felt like, there’s very much a theme and I didn’t wanna scatter them: It’d be like reading chapter two, chapter three and then chapter 14. That EP has its own story. A lot of my songs are a bit of a drag—I say that in jest. But I bring folks outta the sadness. People like different kinds of rock shows and mine’s different from Matt Mays’,” Baldwin explains.

At Saturday’s show, he even warned the crowd: “We’re gonna go somewhere dark here in a minute, but I’m gonna pull you out of it,” he said, leaning on the mic stand as "Delirious" opened in the background.

3. Song nine: A yet-to-be-released track
“I don’t know the name of that song yet—I’ve been calling it “The Ballad of Ezekiel and The Mountie” but that’s a hell of a mouthful. I wrote it about my father and my sister’s husband. I wanted to try it out and I wanted one more song in the lull of the set—it felt like I worked it out with [my band].”
4. Set closing song: “Bonnie Raitt,” from 2013’s Adam Baldwin
“I’m a bar band guy: That’s the stuff I like to do, play some ol’ three-chord bar song that’s fun to play, that people can shake their asses to a little bit. [This song] is supposed to be about as good as anyone can feel in my sets.”

5. The third song in his encore, Bob Dylan’s “License to Kill” from 1983’s Infidels
Baldwin kicked off this cover by saying he’d been “feeling awfully inspired lately by a 14-year-old girl from Sweden, and this one goes out to her, out to Greta.”

When asked about the choice, he says: "I so admire anybody that dedicates themselves to saving this big ball of rock we’re on. I chose that song because the lyrics spell it out to me: It goes ‘Man thinks ’cause he rules the earth he can do with it as he please…Oh, man has invented his doom/First step was touching the moon/Now, there’s a woman on my block/She just sit there as the night grows still/She say who gonna take away his license to kill?’—that just reminds me of her, of Greta...Maybe it’s time for the bonehead white guys to step the fuck aside. I love the sentiment of it.”
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Friday, September 27, 2019

Ten questions with Shotgun Jimmie

The indie songwriter on opening for his heroes Thrush Hermit and curing all ails with barbecued eats.

Posted By on Fri, Sep 27, 2019 at 12:09 PM

Shotgun Jimmie's latest record—Transistor Sister 2, released this August—fulfills your RDI of wistfulness. - SUBMITTED PHOTO
  • Shotgun Jimmie's latest record—Transistor Sister 2, released this August—fulfills your RDI of wistfulness.
  • Submitted photo
Grinding it out in the indie landscape since the mid-2000s, Shotgun Jimmie (real name Jim Kilpatrick) has carved a niche in the pop-tinged, singer-songwriter landscape. With nine albums under his belt and his heart forever on his sleeve, his is the jangly sort of sound that tickles your eardrums—as sugary and energetic as Pop Rocks and Coke.

Tonight (Sep 27), he's hitting the stage at The Marquee to open for legendary '90s Halifax act Thrush Hermit as the band reunites to celebrate the 20th anniversary of its landmark album Clayton Park (get yer tix here). "There was about a year of my life when I listened to Thrush Hermit every single day. Clayton Park is a special one because it has it all: endless jams, anthemic stanzas, powerful pop hooks and soft sincerity," Kilpatrick says in an email. To show how deep his love of  the Herm runs, he also gave us a rough estimate of how many times he's spun the classic LP:

"I know that record inside and out. It's fully a part of my life's soundtrack. Here are some conservative estimates:
Deep headphones listen (seated): 200+
Deep headphone listen (on a bike): 250+
Deep headphone listen (walking): 300+
Deep headphone listen (running): 3
At a party or with friends: 25ish
In a car: 300+
Shower (not the entire record): 150
Cooking or cleaning or whatever: 200"

To prove you've got even more in common than a heart that beats for Joel Plaskett's old band, Kilpatrick also obliged to fill out our questionnaire.

1. What was the first album you bought with your own money?
The soundtrack from [the 1988 movie] Cocktail.

2. If you were to name your influences, which name on the list would be most surprising?
The Beautiful South.

3.What’s the best concert or live performance you’ve ever gone to?
Everything Under the Moon: by Shary Boyle and Christine Fellows.

4. What one thing/person outside of music has shaped the way you make music?
Cheese.

5. Share the last GIF you used below:
I don't use them.

6. Share the last shot on your camera roll below:
screen_shot_2019-09-27_at_11.56.25_am.png

7. When you’re not making music, what are you most likely to be found doing?
The tedious admin work of a self-employed musician and cooking and cleaning.

8. What’s your perfect cure for a bad day?
I like to barbecue on the back deck if the weather will allow it.

9. What’s the best part about being a professional musician?
International cheeses.

10. What do you do when you wanna treat yourself?
For my 40th birthday I bought myself the Fuzz War fuzz pedal made by Death By Audio.
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Friday, September 20, 2019

Twirl on into the weekend with these Sure Things

Posted By on Fri, Sep 20, 2019 at 4:17 PM

From the Brazilian dance troupe Focus Cia de Dança kick-starting Live Art Dance’s new season to Sugar Sammy bringing down the house at Spatz Theatre, it’s a red-hot weekend.

Brazil dance troupe Focus Cia de Dança delivers a boundary-pushing show, Ímpar. Paula Kossatz photo - PAULA KOSSATZ PHOTO
  • Brazil dance troupe Focus Cia de Dança delivers a boundary-pushing show, Ímpar. Paula Kossatz photo
  • Paula Kossatz photo

Sugar Sammy
Friday

The funny guy The New York Times calls "a fearless comic with a talent for provoking both laughter and outrage”, Sugar Sammy brings his particular brand of stand-up to Spatz Theatre. more deets

Focus Cia de Dança
Friday, Saturday

The Brazilian dance troupe Focus Cia de Dança arrives in Halifax thanks to Live Art Dance and Prismatic Arts Festival, ready to wow with the piece Ímpar at Sir James Dunn Theatre. more deets

The Last Wife
Friday, Saturday, Sunday

The Merritt Award-winning, Dora Award-nominated Stephanie MacDonald takes pride in playing tough women—“like your cousin who isn’t gonna let that shit slide at family dinner,” she tells The Coast. Here, she brings her considerable talent and same ain’t-no-pushover attitude to the role of Catherine Parr in Neptune’s season opener, The Last Wife. A play about the careful dance of power and progress, see MacDonald and Jodee Richardson (who plays leading man as King Henry VII) as the ultimate power couple. more deets

Maddie Alexander's latest Khyber exhibit highlights the lasting pain of  microagressions. - MADDIE ALEXANDER PHOTO
  • Maddie Alexander's latest Khyber exhibit highlights the lasting pain of microagressions.
  • Maddie Alexander photo

Celebrating Mary Pratt
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday
At this year’s FIN Atlantic International Film Festival, the flick It was All so Wonderful: The Everyday Magic of Mary Pratt will debut. The Art Gallery of Nova Scotia joins in on celebrating one of Canada’s most beloved artists by displaying her piece"Artifacts on Astroturf" in the gallery’s main lobby. more deets

21 days to make or break a habit
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday
For the first 21 days of November 2018, artist Maddie Alexander embarked on a performance piece that concluded the day after Trans Day of Remembrance. Each day during the performance, Alexander would document whether or not they were misgendered, marking this with self-tattooing on their hands. A year later, the resulting photographs—as well as 21 needles, written notes, and an empty container of ink—will be displayed in the Khyber’s window gallery. more deets

Atmospheric Events
Tursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday
The university gallery's contribution to this year's RESPONSIVE Light Art Festival sees the brutalist building in a whole new light. more deets

Renée Fleming brings big pipes and LA glamour to Symphony Nova Scotia. - TIMOTHY WHITE PHOTO
  • Renée Fleming brings big pipes and LA glamour to Symphony Nova Scotia.
  • Timothy White photo

Vortex w/Enemy Designed, Ignightor
Friday

Face-melting metal awaits at Gus' Pub. more deets

Opera gala: Renée Fleming
Saturday

Called “the people’s diva” by Symphony Nova Scotia, Fleming brings her powerful pipes all the way from the LA classical music scene to your hungry ears (and the Cohn), pairing with the symphony and conductor Alexander Shelley for what it bills as “a blockbuster showcase.” more deets

Since U Been Gone
Friday

The early 2000s dance party you crave at The Seahorse. more deets

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Sunday, September 15, 2019

Ten questions with Mobina Galore

The dairy-and-Timberlake-obsessed Winnipeg punk duo is pleased to meet you—and rip your ears off.

Posted By on Sun, Sep 15, 2019 at 4:00 AM

When Mobina Galore aren't melting faces, the hardcore-tinged duo is travelling the globe to eat cheese and shred guitar. - DWAYNE LARSON PHOTO
  • When Mobina Galore aren't melting faces, the hardcore-tinged duo is travelling the globe to eat cheese and shred guitar.
  • Dwayne Larson photo

From the out-to-please-nobody energy of staying-in anthem "I Need To Go Home" to the brute squall that is "You're Not 23 Anymore", Mobina Galore doesn't give a fuck what you think.

What do drummer Marcia Hanson and guitarist Jenna Priestner care about? Crafting punched-up rock songs they describe as "vocally aggressive power chord punk."  The result lands somewhere between Courtney Love's smeared mascara and Avril Lavigne's biggest rock ambitions—all with vocals ready to teeter into hardcore at any second.

Landing at Gus' Pub tonight (Sunday, Sep 15) hot off the September 6 release of Don't Worry, the duo is ready to melt your face as way of saying hello. And, to help move the introduction along, both Hanson and Priestner have filled out the inaugural edition of this questionnaire.

1. What was the first album you bought with your own money?
Priestner: "I’ve always had this vague memory that it was a Whigfield cassette; I just looked it up and it would have been in 1995. Another similar memory is No Doubt’s Tragic Kingdom, but that may have been a gift."
Hanson: "I honestly can’t remember, but I do remember buying Chantel Kreviazuk’s Under These Rocks and Stones in 1996."

2. If you were to name your influences, which name on the list would be most surprising?
Priestner: "Justin Timberlake."
Hanson: "Cher—which wouldn’t be surprising to anyone that knows me."

3.What’s the best concert or live performance you’ve ever gone to?
Priestner: "It’s a three-way tie between Dixie Chicks (any of the three times I’ve seen them), The Tragically Hip’s final tour or Justin Timberlake’s latest tour. (I almost got to touch his hand!)."
Hanson: "The Tragically Hip’s final tour, tickets were so hard to get but we managed to get four amazing floor seats."

4. What one thing/person outside of music has shaped the way you make music?
Preistman: "My dad, he is so passionate about music and is our biggest fan/critic which both frightens and inspires me."
Hanson: "Cheese, because I wish I could write every song about cheese. I did write a rap about cheese once actually."

5. Share the last GIF you used below:
Priestman: "I’m more of a Bitmoji kind of gal, and this last one is one I sent to Marcia:"

screen_shot_2019-09-18_at_4.20.18_pm.png
Hanson:
unnamed.gif

6. Share the last shot on your camera roll below:
Priestman: "The van pack picture!"

unnamed.jpg
Hanson: "This sweet photo with [famous drummers] Tucker Rule [of Thursday] and Atom Willard [of Against Me!]."
image2.jpeg

7. When you’re not making music, what are you most likely to be found doing?
Preistman: "Puttering around the house, cleaning and tidying, listening to music."
Hanson: "Cooking or playing with my niece and nephews."

8. What’s your perfect cure for a bad day?
Priestman: "Drinks; if it’s summer being in the sun, or if it’s winter probably snuggling on the couch with said drink."
Hanson: "Homemade macaroni and cheese."

9. What’s the best part about being in a band?
Preistman: "Making 15 year old Jenna’s dreams come true."
Hanson: "Getting to travel and eat foreign cheese snacks."

10. What do you do when you wanna treat yourself?
Preistman: "Spa life. And going to the grocery store and buying groceries like we have money or going for dinner."
Hanson: "Going out for fancy dinner and drinks."

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Friday, September 13, 2019

Have a poppin' weekend with these Sure Things

Posted By on Fri, Sep 13, 2019 at 4:54 PM

Get into feast mode at the return of Italian Weekend, rock out with the hardcore punk of Mobina Galore and pass the popcorn at FIN Atlantic International Film Festival's opening weekend.

Hitting up Italian Weekend means feasting on homemade eats like cannoli and endlessly layered lasagna. - RILEY SMITH PHOTO
  • Hitting up Italian Weekend means feasting on homemade eats like cannoli and endlessly layered lasagna.
  • Riley Smith photo

Who Let The Dogs Out screening
Friday
Over 120 movies will be shown at this year's FIN Atlantic International Film Festival—and while they are all awesome in their own way, who could resist this wild, wacky, deep-dive into the Baha Men's biggest hit? Catch it at Cineplex Cinemas Parklane. more deets

Italian Weekend
Friday, Saturday, Sunday

Knocked down but not out by Hurricane Dorian, this festival of all things Italy was postponed to this weekend. Sample language lessons, bocce, and lots and lots of tasty food at the Italian Cultural Centre. Ciao! more deets

The Word on the Street Festival
Saturday
Have you heard the word? The Word on the Street Book & Magazine Festival returns to Halifax Central Library for three floors of author Q&As, poetry readings, panel discussions and more. more deets

North By Night Market
Saturday
The final night market of the summer sees DJs, food trucks and local artisans descend on Gottingen Street for an end-of-season hurrah. more deets

A record of the walks Japanese artist On Kawara took in Halifax builds an emotional map of the city at Hermes. - ON KAWARA ARTWORK
  • A record of the walks Japanese artist On Kawara took in Halifax builds an emotional map of the city at Hermes.
  • On Kawara artwork

The Birds and the Bees
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday
The Nova Scotia Potters Guild's latest group effort sees this pastoral-steeped showcase, buzzing and flapping with works inspired by—and bedecked with—birds and bees, descend upon the Craig Gallery. more deets

Being-in-the Breathable: 44.649589,-63.574150
Saturday, Sunday
A map of the city and its heart, this collection of paintings stamped with co-ordinates act as a record of the walks artist On Kawara took while visiting Halifax in 1973. more deets

Salvador Dali, a suite of prints
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday
The dandy of dadaism and sultan of surrealism, there is no comparison to Dali. Here at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, his later work—widely influenced by the Italian Renaissance and the Catholic Church—provides a rare glimpse into the post-melting-clock years. more deets

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11 Layers
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday
A group showcase by 11 emerging artists who participated in the Centre for Craft Nova Scotia's Summer Professional Development Residency. more deets

The power-punk of Mobina Galore will rock you. - DWAYNE LARSON PHOTO
  • The power-punk of Mobina Galore will rock you.
  • Dwayne Larson photo

Heart Attack Kids w/Diner Drugs
Friday

High-voltage rock that'll shred your eardrums is the big promise the Heart Attack Kids always delivers on. Witness for yourself at Gus'. more deets

Mobina Galore
Sunday
The Winnipeg power-chord punk duo Mobina Galore has shared the stage with the likes of Against Me! and Propagandhi, but steal the show in their own right. See 'em in action at Gus'. more deets

Jah'Mila
Saturday
The roots-y reggae of Jah'Mila will make a fan out of you. Catch the beat at Bearly's! more deets

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Jinjoo Cho w/Hyun Soo Kim
Saturday

Prize-winning violinist Jinjoo Cho returns to the Maritime Conservatory for a highly-charged performance with celebrated pianist Hyun Soo Kim. more deets
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Tuesday, September 10, 2019

Halifax Pop Explosion reveals full 2019 lineup

Buzzy names like Snotty Nose Rez Kids and Hua Li join the likes of PUP and The Arkells from October 23 to 26.

Posted By on Tue, Sep 10, 2019 at 12:04 PM

Hua Li arrives at HPX with her long-awaited full-length record, Dynasty - SUBMITTED PHOTO
  • Hua Li arrives at HPX with her long-awaited full-length record, Dynasty
  • Submitted photo
It was back in April when PUP—the Toronto punk four-piece that's garnering international attention and acclaim for its latest, Morbid Stuff—leaked it'd be playing a show at The Marquee Ballroom, during dates that lined up with Halifax Pop Explosion. And though cool kids around town made sure that set was sold out before it was even announced as an official part of the fest, the rest of us can rest easy: There is plenty more coolness on deck at HPX 2019.

Today, the fest—which has wristbands starting at $80—releases its entire lineup. Among the highlights? The return of the Lil Kim-meets-Lauryn Hill Hua Li, who's dropping a highly anticipated record this fall, as well as the Polaris Prize finalists Snotty Nose Rez Kids—who Jeremy Dutcher has said are part of the wave "leading the Indigenous Renaissance" in Canada today. Big Can-Con fave the Arkells, indie queen Japanese Breakfast and local heavyweights Walrus, Rich Aucoin, Aquakultre and Leanne Hoffman are also on deck, just to start.

Peep the entire lineup here for the fest, which runs October 23 to 26 at venues 'round town.

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Thursday, August 29, 2019

Have a confetti-filled Labour Day weekend with these Sure Things

Posted By on Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 4:46 PM

It's Fringe's opening weekend and the Halifax Urban Folk Fest lineup is stacked, as Labour Day and summer's swan song draws nigh.

Arriving at the Halifax Fringe Fest this weekend, The Other Mozart highlights the true story of Wolfgang's equally talented sister. - SUBMITTED PHOTO
  • Arriving at the Halifax Fringe Fest this weekend, The Other Mozart highlights the true story of Wolfgang's equally talented sister.
  • Submitted photo

Halifax Wanderers FC vs. FC Edmonton
Monday
The perfect cure for Labour Day's end-of-summer blues? Watching an outdoor sport—like soccer at the Wanderers Grounds. more deets

The Other Mozart
Saturday, Sunday, Monday
With a script using lines lifted directly from the Mozart family's letters, this humorous and heartbreaking play traces the life of the prodigy, virtuoso and composer Nannerl Mozart. See it at Neptune as part of the Halifax Fringe Festival. more deets

Awujoh: Creole Heritage Festival
Monday

A family-friendly celebration of Creole food, people, culture and especially music envelops the south Common with gumbay and zydeco sounds. more deets

The Unrehearsed Dream
Sunday
Shakespeare By The Sea gives its seasonal swan song with this one-night-only event: 13 actors are given their parts and lines to Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, but the first time they meet their co-stars is onstage, in front of the audience. The magic happens at Cambridge Battery, Point Pleasant Park. more deets

It's your last weekend to peep Sarah Burwash's gentle watercolours, which subvert gender in soft hues at Studio 21. - SARAH BURWASH ARTWORK
  • It's your last weekend to peep Sarah Burwash's gentle watercolours, which subvert gender in soft hues at Studio 21.
  • Sarah Burwash artwork

Now
Thursday, Friday, Saturday
Anne Launcelott's snaps of rural Russia act as the perfect portrait of the place—and this weekend marks your last chance to see the photos. Better get to Teichert Gallery, stat. more deets

FRESH
Thursday, Friday, Saturday
From Sarah Burwash's dreamlike watercolours to Jenny Yujia Shi's stark works on immigration, the art at this Studio 21 showcase is all subtly political. more deets

An Interior Life
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday
Karen Phinney delivers real Hollis Sigler vibes with her brightly hued canvases capturing intimate living spaces. more deets

screen_shot_2019-08-28_at_5.44.18_pm.png
Flat Form
Thursday, Friday
Ada Denil's large-scale prints remind the viewer of origami or angular puzzle pieces. See them at the Corridor Gallery. more deets

Damhnait Doyle says the record she's bringing to the Halifax Urban Folk Festival is the one she always wanted to make. - SUBMITTED PHOTO
  • Damhnait Doyle says the record she's bringing to the Halifax Urban Folk Festival is the one she always wanted to make.
  • Submitted photo

Phoebe Bridgers Tribute w/The Maes
Thursday
Warming the undercard of this HUFF show at Good Robot, Aussie sister-duo The Maes brings harmonies as vast and sun-dappled as the Outback sky to the stage, tracing the line of '70s folk. more deets

Damhnait Doyle & The Halifax All-Stars w/Opening Song Circle
Friday
Damhnait Doyle brings the best album of her career—the one she says has "no audience out there waiting for" but that she's wanted to make for over 20 years—to The Carleton for what's sure to be an epic Halifax Urban Folk Fest set, tinged with Sheryl Crow vibes. more deets

Keonté Beals
Saturday
From Toni Braxton to Boyz II Men, Beals is versed in golden-era R&B—explaining why he shines so brightly while singing it. Catch the continual glow-up at Stayner's Wharf. more deets

Cassie Josephine & the Cry If I Want To's w/Pretty Archie, Jah'Mila, Eamon
McGrath
Saturday
If you don't already know the sharp roots-y reggae of Jah'Mila (pictured) consider this an overdue introduction. Part of the Haifax Urban Folk Fest, this show happens on the Halifax waterfront. more deets

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In Print This Week

Vol 27, No 28
December 5, 2019

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