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Thursday, April 26, 2007

Yukkin’ it up with Peter White

Tara Thorne has had the time of her life.

Posted By on Thu, Apr 26, 2007 at 8:25 AM

The Halifax Comedy Fest has been putting the city in stitches all week, with a few shows still left to go. One of the comedians old-school Picnicface fans might've recognized is Halifax's Peter White, who threw down on April 23 as part of a line-up of new local comics. He's also just been signed to Yuk Yuk's, a huge deal, especially in these parts.

"I went to Toronto for a competition called the Great Canadian Laugh-Off," says White from the Halifax office where he works as a software engineer. "The brass was down for that show. And I've been doing shows for them out here but I've never been seen by anybody in Toronto. And they took me in the next day and gave me a contract."

The contract means White will tour across Canada, hitting the 15 Yuk Yuk's in cities such as Ottawa, Edmonton and Vancouver. "It's good out here because I'm the only one who's signed with them so I get first dibs on work."

The 23-year-old White, who's trained as an electrical engineer, tried out stand-up via amateur night at Yuk Yuk's during an internship in Calgary. "For some reason I figured I could do it," he says. "I don't know why I thought I could. This was the day before I left, so even if things went horribly, I was gone. When I moved back here I couldn't find any comedy for like a year, or eight months I guess it was, so I just sat on it."

He was in an early incarnation of the popular Picnicface sketch troupe, though he only stops by occasionally these days, and last summer CBC named him one of the top five comics to watch in its "So You Think You're Funny?" competition.

"For the most part it's fairly clean stuff, I think," he says of his style. "Half of it's really family-friendly and half of it's a lot in the other direction. It's not really observational or personal stuff—it's a lot of made-up stories. My life is so boring. A lot of it is the way it's written."

White's gig with Yuk Yuk's means he also gets to perform at the Just for Laughs festival in Montreal, the biggest showcase of comedy in the world, this July. "I'm so excited," he says. "I get to go to a competition for Canadian comics, but the big thing is I get a festival pass. And it's the 25th anniversary so it's gonna be huge. So I just get to watch."

White will appear at the Pacifico, in the Maritime Centre at Salter and Barrington, on April 26 at 8pm as part of the Rising Stars program, which will be taped for television. Tickets are $15 and are available at the door.

I carried a watermelon?

Even though somebody put both Jennifer Grey and Patrick Swayze's careers in corners—Grey did that sailing movie then fucked up her face and Swayze, well, got old—the cult of Dirty Dancing lives on. There's already been a 15th anniversary DVD, an unfortunate 2004 sequel that interrupted its dance climax with a political coup of some kind (seriously), not to mention a Broadway version opening in Toronto later this year. Furthermore (and best of all) there will be two celebratory 20th anniversary screenings this week! Holy crap we're old!

Fill your dance space on May 1 and 2 at Park Lane (7:30pm) and relive your favourite moments from the best non-singing musical ever. Ours include: the name Johnny Castle; the future Emily Gilmore (Kelly Bishop) married to the future Lennie Briscoe (the late Jerry Orbach); Swayze's soulful rendition of "She's Like the Wind" playing while he peels out of the parking lot, leaving Baby standing in a twister of dirt; spaghetti arms; practicing "The Lift" in the lake; the interactive final dance sequence; hell, all the dancing; when Johnny punches cheatin' babydaddy Robbie in the face and being old enough to finally understand what the frig is going on in the abortion subplot.

Did you get it? Email: tarat@thecoast.ca

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Catalogue diggers

Chris McCluskey lines up your concert options.

Posted By on Thu, Apr 26, 2007 at 8:11 AM

Toronto's FemBots are revitalized and back on the road following a break from touring 2005's The City and are now prepared to offer fans the largest live taste of their catalogue to date. The duo of Dave MacKinnon and Brian Poirier—joined by Paul Aucoin and Nathan Lawr—will perform material from all three of the band's records on April 28 at The Seahorse.

"For this trip we've been trying to play as much of our various incarnations of the band, as much of that material as we can. I don't know if we ever made it to Halifax doing strictly the two-man show from our first record, I don't think we did...but we're doing a bunch of songs from that first record, the two-man tape machine era," says MacKinnon. "Then we're sort of working our way through the other two records as well, so it's maybe a little broader range than we've really done on tour before."

On the strength of those three albums, FemBots have become among the most adored independent Canadian bands around. MacKinnon says rare praise from sources like Pitchfork has helped the band, but is uncertain that FemBots have necessarily been vindicated by the media attention.

"It has always been my feeling, and sort of a hope for the band, to just do our own thing and keep chugging along doing what we do...and hopefully putting out good records whether or not they're hugely successful critically, or sales-wise or whatever," says MacKinnon. "I always hope that we can keep doing good work, and sometimes people notice it and sometimes they don't."

Fembots will be supported by Nathan Lawr and Paul's brother, Rich Aucoin.

Atlantic to Atlanta

New Glasgow native Scott Long return to the east coast has been brief. Because of a unique opportunity, he finds himself compelled to head back south. Long, a piper, will be performing with the Grammy Award-winning Atlanta Symphony Orchestra in the Georgia state capital from April 26 to 28.

"I have a band in Orlando called Seven Nations, and we've worked with before," says Long. "My band performed with them, and when it came about they were going to be doing some music that required a bagpiper, I came to mind."

The 95-piece orchestra will be performing Sir Peter Maxwell Davies's "Orkney Wedding with Sunrise," conducted by Donald Runnicles. The prospect of working with an orchestra—that has won 26 Grammys since 1986—in a more in-depth capacity is one Long is excited about.

"I am going to be recording with the orchestra," says Long. "Most of the recordings have been nominated for or won Grammys so it's an opportunity to work on a Grammy-nominated recording, hopefully."

Showtime

Detroit's The White Stripes are set to perform on July 13 at the Cunard Centre (seriously). DJ Champion plays The Marquee Club on September 14, with tickets on sale now at the Cohn box office.

Over time

If regular television programming once again seems monotonous, there are plenty of local music videos popping up on the 'net, including Dog Day's hamster-starring "Lydia." The latest is the Sean Wainsteim-produced video for Jonny Stevens's

"Starting Over." The piece is expected to make its MuchMusic debut this week.

Make your Scene & Heard debut. Email: scene@thecoast.ca

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Thursday, April 19, 2007

The Glorious Life of Joel

Chris McCluskey sings a new tune.

Posted By on Thu, Apr 19, 2007 at 2:21 PM

To illuminate the story of a friendship between two young bandmates that is threaded through The Emergency's new record Ashtray Rock— released April 17—Joel Plaskett found himself referring to material from his beginnings as a singer-songwriter.

"I worked a few lyrics to kind of make them work into the theme of the record. "Snowed In' was a Hermit song, "The Glorious Life' was written in 1994 and then there's this little song called "Ashtray Rock'...I actually wrote the music and the first few lines of that in 1992," says Plaskett, during a break from rehearsals for his upcoming Canadian tour. "I went back into my old songs because I kind of wanted to make a record that was about growing up and playing music...even though it's not entirely an autobiographical story, the songs still come from real places. And I thought if I went back to some older stuff it would help channel that a little bit."

There's no Halifax show currently booked, but Plaskett hints there is something in the works.

"I've gotten a lot of emails from people like "Where is the Halifax show? Why are you neglecting us?'" he says. "But I kind of want it to sink in, and we'll have played the record on a full tour, so when we do it, we've really got it together."

Heelwalkers march again...

It is suspected that longtime hard rock/punk act The Heelwalkers packed its gear up for good back in 2005 but the band's admirers have plans to relive the days they were drawn out to their shows. Blackout '77 bassist Greg Baller says a Heelwalkers tribute act was easy to assemble.

"Everyone was at practice one night going, "The dream would be to have the Heelwalkers reunite.' Which is like, next to impossible. It'll probably never happen," says Baller. "As a joke it was suggested we would put together a tribute band and it crystallized almost instantly. It was on Halifax Locals and all of a sudden people just started chiming in, calling instruments."

Among the all-stars assuming the duties of their favourite Heelwalker are Brent Geike of The Cuban Assassins, Craig Hamlin of The Dean Malenkos, Ryan Frizzell of The Hemingways and Andy Miller of Mitch and the Motorhomes.

"Everyone sort of knows each other but doesn't...and they form a band online. And yep, they're all set to fucking play," says Baller, who cites The Heelwalkers as a major influence for Blackout. "The only practices they are going to do are this week leading up to the show. It would be awesome to have The Heelwalkers play, but I consider this to be the next best thing."

Comedian Candy Palmater hosts "The Heelwalkers," Blackout '77, The Healing Power, A/V and The Noble Son at The Seahorse on April 20.

My aggie!

The Marble Index is heading to Halifax for its east coast headlining debut. Vocalist and guitarist Brad Germain admits a hectic tour schedule spanning three continents has kept the trio—also including drummer Adam Knickle and bassist Ryan Tweedle—busy. He explains the band's progression since, reflected in 2006's Watch Your Candles Watch Your Knives, is part of its maturation process.

"We were a little bit green, still getting used to the process of making a record," says Germain, comparing their two full-length releases. "The new record is probably paced a little bit better."

Look for The Marble Index's Clash-inspired rock at The Pavilion and The Attic on April 20.

Explain your musical progression: scene@thecoast.ca

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Bonjour film festivals

Tara Thorne writes a letter, brings you some arts news.

Posted By on Thu, Apr 19, 2007 at 8:45 AM

Two very different but compelling film festivals kick off this week. (Dear Halifax arts people, Please start sharing schedules with one another so everybody stops doing everything all at once, leaving weeks of empty nights at a stretch, followed by action-packed, conflict-filled weekends every other month. With mad respect, The Dope Show.)

The Atlantic Film Festival's junior edition—which we wholly endorse as the most important film festival in Halifax, exceeding even the AFF, because our future filmmakers have even fewer options than us old folks, what with their curfews and ratings restrictions and pandering marketing—opens on April 24. The sixth edition of ViewFinders kicks off with the Sundance winner War/Dance, and runs until April 28, when it will close with God Grew Tired of Us.

"This year's program will leave you truly inspired," said compelling new VF director Julie Glaser a few weeks ago at the fest's launch party. "We know that young people are utilizing film, video and new media to tell their own important stories and we're proud to support that creative process right here at home with the ViewFinders Festival." Keep an eye out for more on ViewFinders next week, and in the meantime download yourself a guide at atlanticfilm.com/view.

The fifth edition of the DiverCiné festival, an annual exhibition of francophone films based in Ottawa and Vancouver, will expand across the country this year to hit Moncton, Calgary, Toronto and, beginning April 23 at Park Lane, Halifax.

The fest opens with Mahaleo, a doc that uses the titular band, which plays Malagasy music, as the catalyst "in this colourful look back at the anti-colonial movement and various island crises since then." The remaining screenings will drop at the Alliance fran<0x00E7>aise (5509 Young), for two bucks a pop, and they include Raja, La petite Jérusalem, MaRock and Le Voyage en Arménie. For more info on the films and screening times, hit www.divercine.com

Don't you hate pants?

The Halifax Comedy Fest opens this week with a big gala show down in the Schooner Room at Casino Nova Scotia. Fans of Video on Trial will be stoked to see Trevor Boris in the line-up, alongside 22 Minutes staffer Irwin Baker, Air Bud star Doug Funk, "Best Comic in Ottawa" winner Carrie Gaetz and Irish vet Matt Sadlier. The night will be hosted by Steve Patterson. There are a bunch of other shows—including an April 25 set from Dartmouth's Tracey

MacDonald at the Schooner—dropping throughout the week and into next. Visit halifacomedyfest.ca for more comedy than you could spray a can of laughing gas at. (Yeah, that's why we don't do stand-up.)

Clickin' it with Michael Ondaatje

We were surprised, upon reading the fab Johanna Schneller's Q & A with him in last weekend's Globe and Mail, to discover that Michael Ondaatje has as much self-doubt and insularity as any schmo writer, like us. "There are writers who plan everything beforehand and know what the last sentence is going to be. I'm so envious of them," he said. "Even five days before the end, I'm not quite sure if this thing is going to click together." So keep that in mind when you head to the Lord Nelson on May 10 to see him read from his new work Divisadero, his first novel in seven years. Get your tix for $8 at Frog Hollow Books in Park Lane, or if you're a superfan, pay $40 and attend a private reception with the man himself.

You are what you read

If you eat vegan and like reading about it, it's your lucky week. Tumbleweed Publishing is launching TOFU: Living and Breathing Vegan in a World That Smells Fishy. Contributions to the mag come from Winnipeg legends Propagandhi, the kids in Vancouver's Immaculate Machine and Mat Dunlap and Dave Ewenson from CKDU fave Let's Get Baked. TOFU launches April 22 at 2pm at One World Cafe, featuring performances from VeganDreamCake and the Cutie Pies (who will release a special, launch-only EP) and Kev Corbett.

"Releasing this magazine will not only allow us to promote veganism, it will also provide us with a way to promote music as well," says TOFU co-editor, with Claire Gallant, Ryan Patey. "These two things have been an important part of both Tumbleweed Publishing and Tumbleweed Entertainment and it feels incredible to be able to combine them on a national scale."

Hungry just thinking about it? Email: tarat@thecoast.ca

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Tuesday, April 17, 2007

The Great Halloween Swindle

October 30 at The Pavilion

Posted on Tue, Apr 17, 2007 at 2:33 PM



The Great Halloween Swindle
October 30 at The Pavilion
While the big kids had packed The Attic on Saturday, The Great Halloween Swindle reconvened for an encore performance, giving the kids a taste of the cover band action. With the exception of Neville & The Nickersons, a makeshift group slapped together to pay homage to Weezer, the evening was devoted to punk rock legends. Members of The McFaddens and The Hemingways teamed up for a semi-authentic stab at The Ramones, while Blackout ’77 and Dead Red revived their Sex Pistols and Misfits tributes for the third and fourth consecutive Halloweens, respectively. However, it was Jon Epworth who completely stole the show with his band’s bona fide take on Nirvana. Complete with a coarse and hoarse Kurt Cobain, a stoned and indifferent Krist Novoselic, a focused Dave Grohl, an animated Pat Smear, grungewear, forgotten lyrics, mis-tuned instruments, a set-ending drum kit debacle and the omission of the vast majority of the hits (as Nirvana habitually did in their In Utero days), the impression was uncanny, and almost too convincing.

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Dolly Parton

August 27 at the Halifax Metro Centre

Posted on Tue, Apr 17, 2007 at 2:33 PM


photo Michael Tompkins
Published September 01, 2005.
Dolly Parton
August 27 at the Halifax Metro Centre
Promoting her upcoming album of golden oldies in collaboration with contemporary musicians, Dolly Parton sparkled (literally) on the Halifax stop of her Vintage Tour. Parton charmed with her between-song banter, engaging the audience members, cracking wise and attempting to fill requests shouted from the balcony. She giggled and chirped her way through some of her most recognizable hits ("9 to 5" and "Jolene" played back-to-back...unbelievable) and sung other classics from the '60s and '70s, prompting most of the audience to sing along. Switching like a true pro from heartbreaking tear-jerkers to barn-dance tear-downs, Parton displayed her phenomenal musical ability by playing no less than six instruments (including autoharp, dulcimer and harmonica), most of which were festooned with rhinestones. Whether she was telling touching stories about her family or making jokes about boobs, weed and Willie Nelson, Dolly held the audience in the palm of her hand like a little sparrow. And need we mention that the woman is still built like a brick house?

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Avril Lavigne

August 31 at the Halifax Metro Centre.

Posted on Tue, Apr 17, 2007 at 2:33 PM



Avril Lavigne
August 31 at the Halifax Metro Centre.
Thousands of girls singing “It’s a damn cold night” in their squeaky, pre-pubsecent voices, en masse, is an oddity you’d never hear in Halifax clubs. So the Metro Centre — alight with signature A. Lavigne glowsticks and $15 blinking devil horns — played host to the biggest, most expensive sleepover ever. Looking cheery and sounding surprisingly strong, Lavigne ripped through a breathless 75 minute set, dropping her hits among cuts from second album Under My Skin. She hit all the beats — girl power (“This one’s for all the girls!” she shrieked before launching into “Don’t Tell Me”), respect my musicianship (donning a guitar decorated like a Vans checkerboard sneaker, piano on two songs, stepping behind the kit for an encore cover of Blur’s “Song 2”) and capital-D depth (a solo, acoustic guitar version of homeless teen anthem “Nobody’s Home”). Banter was scarce, but three years on the road has certainly made a competent, if predictable, performer out of the once-sullen Ms. Lavigne. And, if you were sitting in the lower bowl, her engagement ring was big enough to cut your face.

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The Proclaimers

September 10 at Casino Nova Scotia.

Posted on Tue, Apr 17, 2007 at 2:33 PM


Published September 15, 2005.
The Proclaimers
September 10 at Casino Nova Scotia.
Funny thing about The Proclaimers is that anyone who knows their music via the Benny and Joon or Shrek soundtracks have sound reasons to imagine them some one-hit wonder novelty act. As the lights dimmed and the smoke machine kicked in under purple and blue lights there was a moment of Spinal Tap cringe. But when the Scottish Reid twins (Charlie and Craig) launched into “Letter from America” all pessimism fell away. They sounded fantastic. Masters of harmony, their use of “hey”s and “yea”s in their songs rivals any ’60s pop group. But most people in the capacity crowd were there to hear “I’m Gonna Be (500 Miles).” And when it arrived the crowd exploded, jumped to its feet and rushed the stage. When it was over most everyone went back to their seats. A few other musical highlights of the night, if anyone cared, were “Cap in Hand,” “The Joyfull Kilmarock Blues” and the heartbreaking rendition, with lap steel guitar, of “Sunshine on Leith.” The evening came to an end fewer than 90 minutes after the lights went down with the Reid brothers’ version of “King of the Road.”

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Songwriter's Circle

September 17 at Hamachi Steakhouse.

Posted on Tue, Apr 17, 2007 at 2:33 PM


photo David Cieplinski

Songwriter's Circle
September 17 at Hamachi Steakhouse.
Because of the threatening forecast Halifax was experiencing due to Ophelia, Ruth Minnikin, Dale Murray, Norma MacDonald and Nathan Wiley’s Songwriter’s Circle was moved from outside into Hamachi Steakhouse at Bishop’s Landing. The restaurant provided an intimate setting for the acoustic quartet, while the wall-sized window provided a backdrop of the thickening fog hovering over the harbour. The weather paled in comparison to the moody melodies being strummed through these folk singers’ guitars.

Murray, MacDonald and Minnikin have made guest appearances on each other’s albums and knew each other’s songs. PEI native Wiley was left to hold his own with “Bottom Dollar Baby,” “Hi Low,” “Home,” “Black Bones” and “Patiently Blue”: “‘Patiently Blue’ is basically about being a miserable bastard, in a nice way.” MacDonald mused about longing, love and aimlessly wandering Boston. Minnikin and Murray grew nostalgic about their days living together across the bridge. Overall it was the best way to spend a dreary Saturday and a good excuse for an afternoon beer.

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Pearl Jam

September 22 at the Halifax Metro Centre.

Posted on Tue, Apr 17, 2007 at 2:33 PM


photo Chris Smith

Pearl Jam
September 22 at the Halifax Metro Centre.
“You’ll only need to write two words to review this show,” slurred the drunken gentleman behind me moments before Pearl Jam hit the stage. “Fuckin’ great.” Three hours and 30 songs later, it was pretty tough to argue with that assessment. With a stripped-down stage setup and a casual approach to performance—the band sauntered on stage without a hint of fanfare and added songs on the fly—the entire production had an intimate atmosphere that few stadium bands can match. Alternating between a bottle of wine and a guitar, Eddie Vedder didn’t miss a note all night, even after it became apparent the marathon music session was taking a toll on his vocal chords. And the band—accompanied by keyboardist Boom Gaspar—was just as good, banging out hits (“Jeremy,” “Daughter”) and b-sides (“Hard to Imagine,” “Breath,”) without hesitation. Some of the many highlights included a pedal-to-the-floor version of “Go,” the singalong favourite “Better Man,” and the extended jam in “Rearview Mirror.” Fuckin’ great? Fuckin’ right.

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Pop Montreal

September 30 - October 2

Posted on Tue, Apr 17, 2007 at 2:33 PM

Published October 06, 2005.Pop MontrealSeptember 30 - October 2Halifax culture popped in Montreal last weekend when Brent Randall and his Pinecones, City Field, Wintersleep and North of America all hit la belle province for the Pop Montreal festival. With all the familiar Haligonian faces in the crowd, Wednesday night's City Field show was like a waking dream where we took a 13-hour detour only to end up at the Khyber Club. The dream turned a little bit nightmarish during the almost incomprehensibly awful psychedelic meanderings of Brooklyn's Tomorrow's Friends, but City Field were chimerically sublime. On Thursday night, scene solidarity was put to the test and reunions ended before they began when fashion-forward French sentries turned away a slew of Halifax pass-holders from the half-empty (in Quebec it's half-full!) Camouflage Nights show. Some shrugged their shoulders in defeat and tried their luck elsewhere, but a few of us stood firm and eventually made it in for the rump-shaking, nouveau soul of Ian McGettigan, Rob Benvie and their team of Halifax ex-pats before running to catch Brent Randall win over a small crowd with his deft, whimsical piano pop. I skipped the Norts to catch the hilarious Rhume and an incredible set by Philadelphia's Man Man, but figured my heart would go on since I can catch the same set sans 13 hour drive-time here in Halifax at the Pop Explosion. Vive le pop!

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Gypsophilia

October 7 at Ginger's Tavern

Posted on Tue, Apr 17, 2007 at 2:33 PM



Gypsophilia
October 7 at Ginger's Tavern
Gypsophilia is the hottest jazz combo in Halifax these days, with its variation on Django-style small-group swing that also incorporates such diverse elements as Klezmer, stride piano and Bird-like explorations of a melodic line. And they are rightly attracting both a young audience as well as seasoned jazz fans. But watching its opening set Friday night was like watching a jalopy lurch down the road — every few minutes its sputtering engine getting a boot to the side — as the members took turns trying to get the sound levels just right. For awhile we suffered through barely audible guitars and ricocheting feedback, prompting a frustrated Dani Oore (on soprano saxophone) to offer up an improvised “Feedback Blues.” But once the kinks were ironed out, the capacity crowd responded with increasing enthusiasm and appreciation. The legion of dancers — who initially went up front in sporadic fits — finally took over at the beginning of the second set. And they never let go, with Gypsophilia responding in kind, until the whole place was whipped into one communal call-and-response, “you do this and we’ll do that” celebration.

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Ted Leo + Pharmacists

October 14 at The Pavillion

Posted on Tue, Apr 17, 2007 at 2:33 PM



Ted Leo + Pharmacists
October 14 at The Pavillion
To those who only saw Ted Leo + Pharmacists’ Marquee set at last week’s Pop Explosion: You saw good, but you missed out on great. The Pavilion show, their second of the festival, was a sweat- and spit- drenched mix of scathing social commentary and a tight-like-Speedos setlist, reminiscent of early 1980s Elvis Costello and Joe Jackson. (Speaking of tight, that bassist Dave Lerner’s pants did not split each time he moved is a miracle of modern garment wizardry.) What made this show special was the connection between the band and the all-ages crowd. Leo managed to get them whipped up into a frenzy, but a friendly and fun frenzy rather than an all-out push fight. The best part of the set was the closing number, in which North of America joined them on stage with a second drum set and tambourines, followed by the first few rows of the audience. It’s not every night a show ends with kids hanging by their knees from the rafters of the venue. Wicked.

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JT Donaldson

October 22 at Reflections

Posted on Tue, Apr 17, 2007 at 2:33 PM



JT Donaldson
October 22 at Reflections
Halifax as the next Chicago? Not a crazy notion when one counts the Windy City DJs who have graced SuperCity stages. Recent appearances by DJ Colette and Johnny Fiasco — and check out this week’s Derrick Carter gig — featured the smooth mid-west sound. Although relocated to San Francisco, former Chicagoan JT Donaldson brought his soulful groove to an appreciative Reflections crowd, promoting his Lounge Grooves CD release. Cam Harding and Jody Crowe warmed up the audience with a set of bumpin’ four-turntable magic — too bad Crowe faced the side of the stage because it wasn’t big enough to accommodate four decks in a row. Donaldson hit the stage at around 1:30am to a packed venue and did not disappoint. The affable DJ’s set was as down-to-earth as his personality, the best part being a funked-up sample of New Order’s “Blue Monday.” Not quite the banging tracks that Hali-dance kids are used to, but chockful of slinky house beats, the hundreds in attendance lapped up every last drop.

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Clumsy CD release

November 5 at Ginger’s Tavern

Posted on Tue, Apr 17, 2007 at 2:33 PM


photo David Cieplinski

Clumsy CD release
November 5 at Ginger’s Tavern
The Good Times, Hard Times Picket Line Band set the tone for a folk-infused evening as CBC purveyors, employees and listeners, gathered to celebrate the release of Clumsy’s debut album. “It seems CBC’s workforce came out more cohesive since the lockout,” said Clumsy, AKA Kevan Corbett. “I know that the record has been out for a little while now, but how can anyone really celebrate a CD release without attributing the CBC?” Decked out in a baseball

t-shirt and black-rimmed glasses, an unshaven Corbett sang folk tales with a borrowed Gibson. Clumsy deals with unrequited love, travelling and quirky metaphors that accent Corbett’s boyish charm. In attempts to re-create the album, he mimicked Reverend Billy Sunday’s 1931 sermon mid-song: “Can I get a Hallelujah? And a bucket of Amen?” He has a unique flair for writing Canadianisms, as the romantic ballad “Growin’ Down” gushed about the country and its treasures: “I’ll hang out with my dog/ Rex Murphy/ and all my friends at the CBC.” And basically that was exactly what transpired. OK, so Rex Murphy wasn’t there.

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Sure Thing Events

  • Milk & Bone @ The Seahorse Tavern

    • Thu., Nov. 22
  • Russell Louder's Glam Cave @ Modulating Mansion Cooperative

    • Thu., Nov. 22
  • The Vinyl Flytrap @ Alteregos Cafe

    • Thursdays, 7-10 p.m.

In Print This Week

Vol 26, No 25
November 15, 2018

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