Openings

Thursday, April 7, 2016

Model tea: Chatime arrives

Taiwanese bubble tea chain opens downtown on Saturday

Posted By on Thu, Apr 7, 2016 at 1:22 AM

Bubble tea a la Chatime
  • Bubble tea a la Chatime

Great pearls of tapioca! Would you trade your Starbucks coffee for some milk tea? Chatime Atlantic is hoping so. The smoothie and juice bar is opening this Saturday, April 9, at 1480 Brenton Street, the spacious ground-floor digs that once upon a time housed Dio Mio ice cream shop, another purveyor of cold treats. Owned by La Kaffa International, a Taiwanese food company that operates more than 1,000 locations in about 26 different countries around the world, this Chatime outlet joins the growing ranks of Halifax’s bubble tea merchants. Halifax was chosen for the newest location because it’s “a great city lifestyle with all the universities and young professionals,” says Chatime accountant John Yuan. “A big coffee and tea culture.”

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Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Cafe 98's fresh take

The former Our Thyme Cafe honours its commitment to fresh, homestyle lunches

Posted By on Tue, Mar 29, 2016 at 4:13 PM

Sunny skies over downtown Dartmouth's newest eatery, Cafe 98 - MELISSA BUOTE
  • Sunny skies over downtown Dartmouth's newest eatery, Cafe 98
  • Melissa Buote

When social enterprise Our Thyme Cafe (98 Portland Street) closed its doors in early 2016, downtown Dartmouth lost a lot of great things. One of them being a place to grab fresh, homey, made-with-love lunches. But earlier this month. husband and wife duo Caroline and Fouad Jarmash swooped in to the Our Thyme space to save the midday meal with Cafe 98.

“We both came from the corporate world and we were kind of tired of it. And both of our families come from a rich history with food,” says Fouad. Inspired by their children and a focus on fresh, non-processed foods at home, the pair had been considering opened their own restaurant for a few years, but the Our Thyme timing was what nudged them to go for it.

“Their misfortune became our opportunity," says Fouad. "We knew we didn’t need to change too much.” For now, Cafe 98 serves up hot drinks, sandwiches, wraps, soups, salads and a hot lunch option weekdays from 7:30am to 4pm, but the owners say though hours may extend as the business settles in.

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Thursday, March 17, 2016

Riot Snack Bar revs up

Farm-to-table fast food on Quinpool

Posted By on Thu, Mar 17, 2016 at 11:26 AM

VIA @RIOTSNACKBAR
  • via @riotsnackbar

Wondering about the red-and-black propaganda-style posters that have recently papered over the windows at the former Garden of Eat’n restaurant at 6293 Quinpool Road? Us too. Turns out they’re a sign of good things to come, thanks to entrepreneurs Nicole Tufts and Sonia Gillies- da Mota. They’re working hard to bring Riot Snack Bar—what Tufts calls “a farm-to-table fast food establishment”—to life.

“Both Sonia and I just can’t stand working for other people,” says Tufts, laughing. “We were inspired to not work for the man anymore.” With a her background working as a chef—and personal experience with food allergies—Tufts is planning a menu of normally unhealthy snack foods made healthy, and made using ingredients sourced from as close to Halifax as possible.

“When you’re looking for a quick bite, it’s hard to find something that’s maybe vegan, or antibiotic- and cruelty-free,” she says of the inspiration behind Riot, which will be modelled with a classic snack bar in mind, offering a small menu of eight to 12 items. “The concept of the snack bar came about during war time in the ’40s, a lot of them opened in military bases,” says Tufts. “And I spent six years in the military myself.”

Given the roomy dining room and massive kitchen to work with Tufts and Gillies-da Mota hope to create a community hub with both work space and dining space and to be able to share their kitchen with other small businesses. Riot Snack Bar aims to be open sometime in late spring.

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Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Murphy Hospitality Group brings us Barrington Steakhouse & Oyster Bar

Let's get shucked up

Posted By on Tue, Mar 1, 2016 at 10:31 AM

The PEI restauranteurs that brought us Gahan House (1869 Lower Water Street) last fall are back at it again, opening Barrington Street Steakhouse and Oyster Bar in the heart of downtown later this spring.

Kevin Murphy's Murphy Hospitality Group will open the 60-seat street level oyster bar, second floor 100-seat dining room and patio at 1662 Barrington Street, putting culinary focus on aged, grass-fed Maritime beef from the Atlantic Beef Plant and local oysters.

"It's going to be spectacular," says Murphy, adding that the Barrington Street Steakhouse and Oyster Bar will have a warm, casual vibe that will complement its neighbours Stillwell and Urban Outfitters. "Barrington Street has such a great history, and seems to be on the verge of revitalization with businesses, the convention centre and downtown in general."

This shucking exciting restaurant announcement comes on the heels of expansion news from fellow steak enthusiasts at CUT Steakhouse (5120 Salter Street), which will add Shuck Seafood and Raw Bar to the mix—with esteemed chef Luis Clavel at the helm—this spring after some renovations.

*On point steak + seafood GIFspiration courtesy of Melissa Buote

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Monday, January 18, 2016

The Highwayman headed for Barrington Street

The 40-seater restaurant aims to open in March

Posted By on Mon, Jan 18, 2016 at 11:31 AM

The Highwayman, a Ceilidh Sutherland (pictured), Dan Vorstermans, Michael Hopper and Adam MacLeod joint - MEGHAN TANSEY WHITTON
  • The Highwayman, a Ceilidh Sutherland (pictured), Dan Vorstermans, Michael Hopper and Adam MacLeod joint
  • Meghan Tansey Whitton

On a winter’s night when the wind is in the trees, as foretold a century ago, The Highwayman will come riding (riding, riding) into Halifax. For in early or mid-March—the official date is yet to be announced-—The Highwayman Restaurant will open at 1673 Barrington Street (the former Certainly Cinnamon location).

The Highwayman is a new restaurant venture from Adam MacLeod, Michael Hopper, and Field Guide owners Dan Vorstermans, and Ceilidh Sutherland. MacLeod is head bartender at Field Guide, and Hopper tended bar at La Frasca. The name is inspired by the Alfred Noyes poem, which was first published 100 years ago this August. “It’s a really, really beautiful poem,” says Sutherland. “We’ve been using the imagery as reference for a lot in the design elements on the restaurant. It’s kind of dark and moody, there are lots of textural references and weather references. It’s been a really neat way to be inspired; I’ve never really experienced this before.”

The 40-seat restaurant will have a large food menu with some sharing components along with a traditional menu of appetizers and main courses. “There will be some Spanish inspiration,” says Sutherland, “But other than that, we don’t want to give away too much in terms of what we’re doing with the food. We are going to have a late night menu, though. Stillwell is across the street; we won’t be competing with them, though; we’ll be a companion.”

While Vorstermans will be doing double duty heading up the kitchen at both restaurants, there will, of course, be a beverage program by Hopper and MacLeod as well as a similar devotion to quality front-of-house and back-of-house staffing, you shouldn’t expect a carbon copy of Field Guide. “We already have a great place with a 16 drink cocktail menu, so we don’t really think we need to do that again,” says Sutherland. “This menu will be focused on other spirits, like Sherry and Amaro. And we want to focus on people having a more expansive experience of coming in and ordering a cocktail, having food, drinking wine.”

The foursome has been working on the restaurant for the past few months, and construction is still underway. “It’s a really cool space, a really old building with a lot of really cool components. We’re all really excited about,” says Sutherland. They are also excited to have a space downtown. “I feel like it’s the right time. I think Barrington Street is going to blow up so, again, it feels really good to be on the cusp of something.

“I know that right now in that neighoburhood there are a lot of issues for businesses because of the convention centre being built. My hope always is that opening a new business can only help those other places,” Sutherland says, citing Field Guide’s relationship to EDNA.

“It’s such a good relationship, a good back and forth: you can borrow stuff from each other, our staff is constantly over there eating and drinking and their staff is constantly over here eating and drinking. It creates this culture that’s really important. And hopefully we will see that happen on Barrington Street: people eating at Highwayman and drinking at Stillwell. I hope that’s what will happen. And there are whisperings of other places opening on Barrington Street, so hopefully that’s just going to get better and better.”

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The Highwayman headed for Barrington Street

"I think Barrington Street is going to blow up so, again, it feels really good to be on the cusp of something."

Posted By on Mon, Jan 18, 2016 at 4:00 AM

On a winter’s night when the wind is in the trees, as foretold a century ago, The Highwayman will come riding (riding, riding) into Halifax. For in early or mid-March—the official date is yet to be announced-—The Highwayman Restaurant will open at 1673 Barrington Street (the former Certainly Cinnamon location).

The Highwayman is a new restaurant venture from Adam MacLeod, Michael Hopper, and Field Guide owners Dan Vorstermans, and Ceilidh Sutherland. MacLeod is head bartender at Field Guide, and Hopper tended bar at La Frasca. The name is inspired by the Alfred Noyes poem, which was first published 100 years ago this August. “It’s a really, really beautiful poem,” says Sutherland. “We’ve been using the imagery as reference for a lot in the design elements on the restaurant. It’s kind of dark and moody, there are lots of textural references and weather references. It’s been a really neat way to be inspired; I’ve never really experienced this before.”

The 40-seat restaurant will have a large food menu with some sharing components along with a traditional menu of appetizers and main courses. “There will be some Spanish inspiration,” says Sutherland, “But other than that, we don’t want to give away too much in terms of what we’re doing with the food. We are going to have a late night menu, though. Stillwell is across the street; we won’t be competing with them, though; we’ll be a companion.”

While Vorstermans will be doing double duty heading up the kitchen at both restaurants, there will, of course, be a beverage program by Hopper and MacLeod as well as a similar devotion to quality front-of-house and back-of-house staffing, you shouldn’t expect a carbon copy of Field Guide. “We already have a great place with a 16 drink cocktail menu, so we don’t really think we need to do that again,” says Sutherland. “This menu will be focused on other spirits, like Sherry and Amaro. And we want to focus on people having a more expansive experience of coming in and ordering a cocktail, having food, drinking wine.”

The foursome has been working on the restaurant for the past few months, and construction is still underway. “It’s a really cool space, a really old building with a lot of really cool components. We’re all really excited about,” says Sutherland. They are also excited to have a space downtown. “I feel like it’s the right time. I think Barrington Street is going to blow up so, again, it feels really good to be on the cusp of something.

“I know that right now in that neighoburhood there are a lot of issues for businesses because of the convention centre being built. My hope always is that opening a new business can only help those other places,” Sutherland says, citing Field Guide’s relationship to EDNA.

“It’s such a good relationship, a good back and forth: you can borrow stuff from each other, our staff is constantly over there eating and drinking and their staff is constantly over here eating and drinking. It creates this culture that’s really important. And hopefully we will see that happen on Barrington Street: people eating at Highwayman and drinking at Stillwell. I hope that’s what will happen. And there are whisperings of other places opening on Barrington Street, so hopefully that’s just going to get better and better.”

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Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Coming soon: Portland Street Creperie

Crepe expectations for downtown Dartmouth

Posted By on Wed, Oct 14, 2015 at 12:56 PM

VIA FACEBOOK
  • via Facebook

Lifelong Dartmouthians, and father-son business partners, Neil and Max Cook understand the beauty of a handheld snack. The pair are behind the Portland Street Creperie (55 Portland Street), a new cafe/restaurant that’s aiming to greet downtown Dartmouth by the end of October.

“When Max and I started talking about this in the early summer, about the idea of a business, I was focussed on having a meal in your hand—with the ferry and buses nearby—and this was kind of an evolution,” says Neil.

The small french-style bistro will sit around 15 people and serve locally-roasted coffee, but the Cooks say the crepes with be “queen of the shop”. The menu of 12 or so flavours will feature both sweet and savoury options, with a focus on local ingredients. Max—who’ll be running the kitchen—says he aims to keep crepes in the four-to-seven dollar range and the Portland Street Creperie will be open seven days a week.

“He’s always heard me talking about these ideas and the opportunity presented itself, my dad wanted to follow a dream of getting to know the community you’re in,” says Max of the good timing that pushed him to team up with his dad to open a restaurant.

“Downtown Dartmouth is going through a transformation, we want to support the overall change happening here,” says Neil. “It’s more than just the business itself. we looked at the environment and what was out there and felt we could fill a niche here.”

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Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Sneak Peek: Studio East (opening tonight!)

The new bar and restaurant on Cunard Street serves up rich Asian-inspired dishes

Posted By on Tue, Oct 13, 2015 at 10:53 AM

Steam Buns with braised pork and Asian slaw, a totally rich and amazing flavour - ADRIA YOUNG
  • Steam Buns with braised pork and Asian slaw, a totally rich and amazing flavour
  • Adria Young

On Saturday, Studio East served up a tapas of Asian-inspired dishes as chefs Saronn Pov and Ray Bear offered a tapas-style sneak peek of the rich and flavourful menu in the rustic but modern space on Cunard Street. With her Cambodian roots, Pov was a longtime vendor at the Keith's Brewery Market, but she is delighted to open her first restaurant. Tonight, all of Halifax is welcome to try it out. And based on what I tasted, you'll be back. I know I will. 

The menu features a complementary palette of Asian-inspired but locally produced meat and vegetarian dishes. The decor is inviting and cozy but contemporary and crisp. Fine art (including a portrait of Bill Murray) adorns the walls. The bar and kitchen is exposed, and the bright dining area features benches with low dining tables, while a community-style table centres the room. 

For drinks, Studio East has well-priced local craft beers, ciders, cocktails and a wine selection from Valley wineries. The menu features dishes like Char Sui BBQ Pork Ramen, Cambodian banh mi, Korean beef bulgogi, raw oysters, warm sushi and more. The dishes are flavoured in fusion while maintaining an East Asian taste with fresh, local ingredients. Truly delicious. 

For more information and hours, visit their Facebook site. Yum. 

Studio East, when pigs fly - ADRIA YOUNG
  • Studio East, when pigs fly
  • Adria Young

The resto mixes the building's original features with a modern flair - ADRIA YOUNG
  • The resto mixes the building's original features with a modern flair
  • Adria Young

Fine art, clean lines - ADRIA YOUNG
  • Fine art, clean lines
  • Adria Young

Chef Ray Bear returns - ADRIA YOUNG
  • Chef Ray Bear returns
  • Adria Young

Char Sui BBQ Pork Ramen Bowl (poached egg, veggies, herbs, crispy pork bits) - ADRIA YOUNG
  • Char Sui BBQ Pork Ramen Bowl (poached egg, veggies, herbs, crispy pork bits)
  • Adria Young


Warm Sushi (smoked salmon, spicy mayo, egg crepe) - ADRIA YOUNG
  • Warm Sushi (smoked salmon, spicy mayo, egg crepe)
  • Adria Young


Saronn Pov cooks each dish with love - ADRIA YOUNG
  • Saronn Pov cooks each dish with love
  • Adria Young

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Friday, October 2, 2015

Nine Locks Brewery to open in Dartmouth

Expanding on Rockbottom Brewpub's well-known craft beers in a big way

Posted By on Fri, Oct 2, 2015 at 3:28 PM

The surge of Nova Scotian craft beer continues with Nine Locks Brewery; the joint venture between Shaun O'Hearn (owner of Rockbottom Brewpub and Your Father's Moustache) and business partner Danny O'Hearn aims to be brewing at 219 Waverley Road (same building as the beloved Mic Mac Bar & Grill) by late November.

The microbrewery, named for the nine locks of Dartmouth's Shubenacadie Canal, is something the O'Hearns (distant cousins) have been dreaming up for some time. "I'm a big lover of craft beer, I mean obviously I have a brew pub already," says Shaun. Danny has a background with Moosehead. "But we’re at maximum capacity already with Rockbottom, we can’t make anymore and I don’t have any room to expand."

The next logical step was Nine Locks, where Rockbottom brewmaster Jake Saunders along with Chris Downey (a longtime brewer at Montreal's Brutopia) will work to make a line of beers that'll be available by the growler as well as in tall cans at a brewery retail shop, NSLC locations, restaurants and private liquor stores. For starters, they'll be brewing six styles—an IPA, extra special bitter, white, American pale ale, porter and an India session ale.

“The more breweries that open the better it is for everyone," says Shaun. “It really adds to the recognition for local craft breweries. And it opens everyone’s eyes to different types of beer. Someone who’s drinking just mainstream beer, like Labatt, Molson, Keith’s, they might come in, buy a couple single cans, and see if they like it.”

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Saturday, August 8, 2015

Brooklyn and North team up for Battery Park

Congrats, Dartmouth, you’re officially Manhattan

Posted By on Sat, Aug 8, 2015 at 2:30 PM

screen_shot_2015-08-08_at_1.50.36_pm.png

Back in June Brooklyn Warehouse and North Brewing Company piqued interests with a little tease—the beloved restaurant and craft brewery were teaming up and taking the show on the road to Dartmouth. Together, they’d open something new, a bar, in the former Nectar Restaurant and Wine Bar (62 Ochterloney Street) space. But the rest was a mystery.

Yesterday, the beans were finally spilled. Battery Park Beer Bar and Eatery is the name, craft beers (North and otherwise) and chef Mark-Gray-imagined small plates, designed for sharing are the game. And they’re hoping to have the 65-seat space ready for October.

“I think it is going to be pretty different, we don’t really like to duplicate one spot after another,” says Brooklyn Warehouse/Ace Burger’s George Christakos. “We’re always getting inspired and learning new things about our trade. This will be a combination of lots of things we’ve learned from Brooklyn. But it’s more of a bar.”

Part of the building will be designated as a North Brewing Company retail shop, for growler filling and one-off brews courtesy of Peter Burbridge and Josh Herbin. North will also use this opportunity expand upon its current Agricola Street brew house, zeroing in on its goals of being a zero emissions operation.

“This was very much a collaborative idea, with Peter being extremely involved, and Mark is now a lot more involved in the creative aspect of it,” says Christakos. “The name actually came from Mark, who got really inspired doing some research. He went down the rabbit hole.” Battery Park makes reference to the southern Manhattan park of the same name, which was originally an artillery battery that protected the city but eventually housed a massive beer garden. "It's akin to so much we know in Nova Scotia, with the Citadel and York Redoubt."

Like Brooklyn Warehouse has before, Battery Park will launch crowdfunding campaign—complete with some pretty sweet returns—to help in getting the project off the ground, a move Christakos sees it as another great way of involving the community in the process.

“What we learned in the first one, 85 percent of the people who crowdfunded with Brooklyn shared the same postal code as the restaurant," says Christakos. "People in a neighbourhood want to be proud of their neighbourhood. And we want to be part of the fabric of Ochterloney Street.“


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Thursday, July 30, 2015

New restaurant alert: Hong Yun Chinese

Authentic eats on Brenton Place

Posted By on Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 5:09 PM

dsc_4140.jpg

In the former home of The Cellar Bar & Grill (5677 Brenton Place)—which closed back in March—rises Hong Yun Chinese Restaurant, the latest spot to add to your to-try list . The new eatery opened to downtown diners in mid-July, serving up both authentic Chinese and Canadian Chinese cuisine. Owners Sui Fang Yu and Gigi Yu have long aspired to open their own place and it's no wonder, there's over 30 years of restaurant experience between them. Their promise? Top quality, authentic food. Period.

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Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Highway to Bells Ice Pops

Homemade popsicles on wheels!

Posted By on Wed, Jul 15, 2015 at 11:01 AM

The Bells mobile
  • The Bells mobile

When I hear bike bells in the summer I still crane my neck hoping to see a Dickie Dee rip around the corner in my direction, but it’s usually for naught. Until recently, when Susan Patterson’s handmade popsicle wagon Bells Ice Pops rolled its way onto Halifax and Dartmouth’s streets.

Patterson rekindled her love for popsicles while she was in labour with her daughter, when they served as more than a sweet treat. "At the time it seemed like the best thing in the world," she says. "When I got home I craved popsicles but didn't want the artificial colours and a ton of sugar so I began making them." A former pastry artist with an entrepreneurial spirit, Patterson started planning her own venture based around handmade, preservative-less versions of the corner store treat, made with local ingredients.

"In researching popsicles online I became enamoured with cute bicycle wagons and overtaken by the nostalgia of them from my childhood," she says. "While doing something because it is cute and nostalgic isn't necessarily the right reason to jump into business, I felt there was a market for healthier, handmade, yummy treats that can pop up at local events and gatherings and I wanted to get back into the kitchen."

Now, she's peddling seasonally inspired popsicles in flavours like key lime pie, strawberry rhubarb, salted caramel, peach iced tea and raspberry lemonade (and also “pup-sicles” for the sweaty dogs, the world’s cutest creation) on a pop-up basis. Last weekend she was on Gottingen Street, tomorrow she'll be cooling folks off at the Halifax Food Truck Party. (And Bells Ice Pops is also on the Street Food App.)

"As a neighbour told me her young son was entranced by the idea of a popsicle bicycle that comes to your street. There is the element of the unexpected when it does come down your street and when you hear the bells, there is anticipation and the fun of finding where the sound is coming from," says Patterson. "And who doesn't love a frozen treat on a hot summer day?"

image3.jpg
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Thursday, July 9, 2015

Craig Flinn to open Temple Bar, Cocktails and Kitchen on Barrington Street

Save your One Door Down jokes, he's heard them all

Posted By on Thu, Jul 9, 2015 at 1:19 PM

Good things come in threes for Craig Flinn
  • Good things come in threes for Craig Flinn

Craig Flinn’s restaurant family is growing. This September he’ll welcome another bundle of food and drink joy, Temple Bar, Cocktails and Kitchen, to 1533 Barrington Street, the former home of J&R Grimsmo—which is conveniently one door down from both his other establishments, Chives Canadian Bistro and 2 Doors Down. The idea sprouted when Flinn’s landlord contacted him upon hearing of Grimsmo’s closure, offering him the soon-to-be-vacant space.

“It was a pretty logical thing in our minds, to put something between the other two spots, in terms of guests that were waiting, but we also want to create a different kind of experience,” says Flinn. Temple will be “bar-forward”, with a strong focus on iconic cocktails with a seasonal, Nova Scotian twist, local craft beers, cider and wine by the glass. From the kitchen side of things, you’ll still get that Flinn-esque farm-to-table experience, but with an international twist—he’ll be calling on Spanish, Italian, French and UK influences to build a bar menu of appetizers, sharing plates and a multi-course tasting menu. “It’s a place to catch the overflow that we lose to other places on busy nights, but it’s not a holding bar. It’s a separate business, with a separate identity and feel. It gives us an pop to create something new. A new feeling.”

Despite enduring some construction and sidewalk related headaches on Barrington Street as of late, the chef, restauranteur and honourary block owner (just saying, shouldn’t he be?) is excited to have the opportunity to keep his establishments together.

“I have great difficulty letting go of the reins. I know have a fantastic team of chefs, sous chefs and business partners, but I still want to be able to keep an eye on things... I can be in each of my three restaurants with in three minutes of each other,” says Flinn. “I’m very hands on. The product is personal and it’s not cookie cutter, you need that hands on kind of thing. I don’t chop the onions or caramelize the sea scallops, but I like to be around all the time.”

While a 25-foot bar will be Temple’s centrepiece, Flinn says they’ll be using the space’s natural charms—stone walls, exposed bricks, pillars—to inform that new feeling he’s talking about. With the space currently under renovations, he's aiming for a early-to-mid September opening.

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Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Heeeere's Johnny K's

Johnny K's Authentic Donairs is coming to Grafton and Blowers

Posted By on Wed, Jun 24, 2015 at 3:22 PM

click image 11403356_814174125327674_7211604044763616020_n.jpg

When paper went up in the windows of European Food Shop (5246 Blowers Street) back in April, people prematurely mourned the death of our greasy friend Pizza Corner. Change is hard, it's true, but we've said it before, pizza is forever.

Just when everyone was busy losing their shit over the end of an era—@NBDHFX appeared, letting the people know via hashtag that Pizza Corner Is Not Dead. The new resident of Grafton and Blowers urged hungry drunk-food hunters (as well as the sober daytime ones) to "stay hungry" because "an iconic corner deserves a legendary dish".

That legendary dish is the donair, of course, and earlier this week it was revealed that NBD would actually be Johnny K's Authentic Donairs, a joint effort between Mezza Lebanese Restaurant Group's Nahas family and Marcel Khoury, of HFX Sports Bar and Halifax Alehouse fame. The eatery's namesake Johnny K is John Kamoulakos, the building's owner and supposed donair inventor. In short, these donairs will be the real deal.

Johnny K's is set to open in July, bringing traditional handmade beef, chicken and vegetarian donairs —as well as Greek gyros and Turkish doner kebabs—to diners eating in and taking out. As you await a taste, follow the progress at @Johnnyksdonair

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Friday, March 27, 2015

Brenton Restaurant replaces 1,001 Nights

Dig into North American and Persian Cuisine

Posted By on Fri, Mar 27, 2015 at 3:53 PM

11080891_1413995215581383_8247511101344644605_n.jpg

The last few weeks have brought a lot of changes to 5677 Brenton Place. Unfortunately, both The Cellar Bar & Grill and its upstairs neighbour 1,000 Nights have both served their last meals, but the brand new Brenton Restaurant is the bright spot in this story.

The family business is the brainchild of Amin, Mahmood and Rezvean Chadeganipour, who after running a couple of Halifax's Treats cafes decided to go bigger. When the opportunity to take over the downtown space presented itself, they jumped on it, hiring chef Florentino De Aguiar to take the reins in the kitchen. "They're home-cooks, so I'm leaning the Persian side of things from them and they're learning North American from me," says De Aguiar. "For me its an eye-opener, there's a lot of bold flavours, it's been a good learning experience."

Brenton Restaurant officially opened its doors just over a week ago, serving up North American classics like maple glazed salmon, pan-fried haddock, a New York striploin and chicken linguine and Persian eats like a chicken and beef kebabs, meat and vegetable stews and various appetizers. Like 1,001 Nights, two-floor restaurant still offers hookah upstairs, as well as a room for business meetings or private lunches, and is available for catering. Check out Brenton Restaurants Facebook page here.

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In Print This Week

Vol 27, No 5
June 27, 2019

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