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Seeking second-generation Nova Scotians who’ve made a difference

ISANS is looking for nominees to profile in a new book on the long-term benefits of immigration.

Jacob Boon Sep 5, 2018 16:51 PM
Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

The Immigrant Services Association of Nova Scotia is looking for some second-generation Canadians to share their stories for a new book on the long-term benefits of immigration.

Anyone can nominate either themselves or someone they know (with the nominee's permission) provided they were born in Canada to an immigrant parent.

Selected nominees will be photographed and profiled in the upcoming book that will be published in hardcover, with individual stories shared online and over social media.


“The way we do such a project is to collect a large number of nominations and then sort them for diversity, to have people from different cultural backgrounds, areas of work, parts of Nova Scotia, age, et cetera,” reads a media release from ISANS public relations coordinator Clancy Waite. “The final selection is therefore dependent on who is nominated.”

From 2011 to 2016, Nova Scotia saw a 15-percent increase in immigration, with the total number of landed immigrants and permanent residents in the province totalling 55,675.

The Immigrant Services Association of Nova Scotia helps many of those newcomers by assisting with employment support, language help, community integration and other support services.

This Friday, September 7, the organization will also be co-hosting an immigrant fair at the Canadian Immigration Museum at Pier 21. New residents will be able to hear from entrepreneurs who also recently arrived in Nova Scotia, and access resources to help them settle into their new home.

To nominate yourself or someone else for ISANS’ upcoming book, send their name, email address and phone number, age, city/community, occupation, heritage and a small write-up of their community impact to kread@isans.ca by next Friday, September 14.

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