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Letters to the editor, December 5, 2013 

These are the letters and comments from the print edition

Fluoride bouquet

I grew up in West Island, Montreal in the 1950s/'60s without fluoridated water ("Halifax Water should stop poisoning us," Voice of the City by Dana Landry, November 28).

I've always had lousy teeth. If one were a Quebecer or from eastern Ontario at that time or earlier, there was a stereotype socially and in literature that French-Canadian women had bad teeth. It wasn't just the ladies: Anglo women and men and French men all had bad teeth.

There are still boroughs in Montreal that don't have fluoridated water and they lead the way in Canada with cavities for adolescent and pre-adolescent kids. It's just a chemical, benign at the levels in our water. Get over it and enjoy good dental health.

I'm now 61 years old with a good 20 years ahead of me. I'm sure blood and tissue tests will show beer, pot, acid and a low level of fluoride. None of these substances will have proven fatal when I pass in 20 years.

I hope I don't read any articles in The Coast saying vaccines are dangerous. If one doesn't like fluoride, it's only your teeth and those of your offspring that are affected. Bad science and the resulting disbelief of the value of vaccines leads to a much broader and deleterious effect on society as a whole. —John Nancekivell, via email

I can't believe you gave any credence to the anti-fluoride activists by printing it in your paper. This is the same internet-driven pseudo-science bullshit that has some parents not vaccinating their children against disease! —Charles Sullivan, Halifax

If the sodium hexafluorosilicate (fluoride) added to HRM water doesn't prevent cavities, is linked to hypothyroidism and thyroid cancer and leads to discoloured teeth and brittle bones, then why does it continue to be put in our water?

On the other hand, if the scientific evidence comes down very strongly on the side of fluoridated water reducing cavities, and contradicts the negative effects noted, would the provincial medical officer of health please clearly indicate to the public what the nature of this evidence is?

Because a practice has been in use for some time isn't in itself a valid reason for continuing it. —David Blackwell, Eastern Passage

Crime locations

I wish the politicians and officials who think that bars are Halifax's problem would give their heads a shake ("2am cabaret closing?," Reality Bites by Tim Bousquet, November 28). They are looking at the highly visible minor irritations instead of the more insidious problems associated with major crimes. It's like treating your acne while ignoring your cancer.

The real issue is poverty. The real issue is wannabe thug culture, associated with poverty. The real issue is drugs and knives and guns, associated with wannabe thug culture, associated with poverty.

Drunken, loutish, occasionally fighting students are an irritant, but they are far from being Halifax's real crime problem. Once every year or two there is a major incident downtown. Meanwhile, there is violence every night in other parts of the city.

All this focus on the bar district is shortsighted and willfully ignorant of where the real violent crime problems start and stop---nowhere near Argyle Street. —posted by Jammie at

Restricted access

Nevermind the escalator being removed (On Patrol, November 28). Your picture shows the real municipal malfunction: Why did we get a super new playground on Alderney Landing and a week after it was finished, workers come and rip up the whole area outside the ferry terminal, blocking the only access route to the playground? Why does it take three months to replace a bit of paving that could be done in a week? Or, why can't they do this work bit by bit, so people can still walk to the terminal? —Christian Ensslin, Dartmouth


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