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Anatomy of Assistance 

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You may know him as Cory from the Trailer Park Boys, a role he's been playing for years, but Truro's Cory Bowles' true passion lies behind the camera.

Anatomy of Assistance is his third go at directing a short film and follows the spunky young black student Talia (beautifully acted by Keeya King) as she sets in motion a series of unfortunate events after she refuses a handout from The Black Student Assistance program. "I don't understand what the money's for" she argues with her guidance counsellor James (Clé Bennett). "Just think about it as encouragement, incentive for doing well, staying in school...look there's no discrimination, every student gets it," he says. "Every black student," she counters. "It's from black people...take it or don't but understand that when people donate their hard earned [cash] to offer you assistance to encourage you to do something good–you should let them."

Her only response to the admonishment is a raised fist–an image cleverly mirrored in the graphic on James' shirt–and the first hint of her stubborn naivety. Later, after spending the money on booze in the park she exclaims "I feel like Malcolm X!" before taking a swig from the liquor bottle and spitting it out. Before she knows it she's in a stand off with Officer Rayley (Raven Dauda)–who in catching Talia underage drinking, tries to scare some sense into her, which doesn't exactly go according to plan.

In score and freeze-framed effects Bowles' film feels almost heist-like as we follow Talia's envelope of money from hand to hand. In the end it's a message of both social change and awareness that resonates as Talia finds her place in the world and realizes that being proud doesn't necessarily mean going it alone–financially or otherwise.


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